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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Shell Structures in Wood

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue19
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Market and Adoption
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shell Structures
Author
Cheng, Alexandra
Meyboom, AnnaLisa
Hunter, Jessica
Neumann, Oliver
Cloutier, Roy
Maia, Sara
Gaudin, Thomas
Tannert, Thomas
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shell Structures
Topic
Market and Adoption
Design and Systems
Keywords
Design
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The larger intention of this research and the future research trajectory is to expand the conception of wood as a structural building material, encouraging its broader use both within Canada and in emerging markets. When architects and engineers desire a...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Shell Structures for Architecture

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1156
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shell Structures
Editor
Adriaenssens, Sigrid
Block, Philippe
Veenendaal, Diederik
Williams, Chris
Publisher
Taylor&Francis Group
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Book/Guide
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shell Structures
Topic
Design and Systems
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
ISBN
9781317909385
Summary
Bringing together experts from research and practice, Shell Structures for Architecture: Form Finding and Optimization presents contemporary design methods for shell and gridshell structures, covering form-finding and structural optimization techniques. It introduces architecture and engineering practitioners and students to structural shells and provides computational techniques to develop complex curved structural surfaces, in the form of mathematics, computer algorythms, and design case studies.
Online Access
Payment Required
Resource Link
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Affordances of Complexity: Evaluation of a Robotic Production Process for Segmented Timber Shell Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1913
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shell Structures
Author
Krieg, Oliver David
Bechert, Simon
Groenewolt, Abel
Horn, Rafael
Knippers, Jan
Menges, Achim
Publisher
Intergrated Digital Conference (INDICO)
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Korea
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Shell Structures
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Robotic Fabrication
Computational Design
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 20-23, 2018, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Feasibility of Cross-Laminated Timber Cores for the UBC Tall Wood Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1905
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shafts and Chases

Transferability of 2021 International Building Code Tall Wood Building Provisions to the National Building Code of Canada

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2806
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Organization
GHL Consultants Ltd.
Fast + Epp
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Other Materials
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
National Building Code of Canada
International Building Code
Building Code
Encapsulated Mass Timber Construction
Encapsulation
Exposed Mass Timber Elements
Building Height
Building Area
Fire Resistance Rating
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The acceptable solutions in Division B of the anticipated 2020 NBCC limit the height of Groups C and D buildings of sprinklered encapsulated mass timber construction (EMTC) to 12 storeys in building height, and a measured building height of 42m. The recently published 2021 IBC contains provisions to permit buildings of mass timber construction under the IBC Type IV construction, surpassing the NBCC provisions by maximum building height, building area, occupancy groups, and interior exposed timber. The IBC mass timber buildings are permitted to have a building height of maximum 18 storeys, depending on the occupancy group. Within Type IV construction, four subdivisions are described to have varying maximum permissible building height, area, fire resistance rating (FRR), and interior exposed timber. Through a comparison of mass timber provisions of both Codes, relevant research reports, test reports, industry standards, this report documents the consequential and inconsequential differences and developed conclusions on whether the NBCC can adopt the IBC provisions, and with what modifications so that the new provisions may fit the NBCC context.
Online Access
Free
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Wood Cityscapes: Mass Timber Office Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2300
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hovhannisyan, Mariam
Publisher
University of Washington
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Office Buildings
Mid-Rise
Cost
Schedule
Greenhouse gas emissions
Prototype
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Most office building construction relies on steel and concrete for mid-high rise office building applications. The primary goal of this thesis is to understand the implications of CLT and mass timber construction systems for mid-high rise office buildings in Seattle by developing a prototypical office building located on a specific site. This research thesis will focus on comparing this prototypical mass timber office building design to the same/similar design using industry standard construction materials for Seattle. The criteria for comparison will include code, cost, schedule and greenhouse gas emissions.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Feasibility Study of Using Cross-Laminated Timber Core for the UBC Tall Wood Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1262
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Moudgil, Manu
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Concrete Core
Seismic Loading
National Building Code of Canada
Mass Timber Core
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Mass-timber has gained popularity in the construction of mid-rise buildings in the last decade. The innovation of constructing tall buildings with mass-timber can be seen in the student residence at Brock Commons built in 2016 at the University of British Columbia. It is the world’s tallest timber hybrid building with 18 stories and 53 meters’ height above the ground level. The building has 17 stories of mass-timber superstructure resting on a concrete podium with two concrete cores that act as a lateral force resisting system for earthquake and wind forces. The mass-timber superstructure of 17 stories took ten weeks whereas the concrete cores were built in fourteen weeks. There could have been a substantial reduction in the project timeline leading to cost savings, if mass-timber was used for the cores. The motivation for concrete cores was driven by the sole purpose of easier approval procedure. The objective of this thesis was to evaluate the possibility to design the Brock Commons building using mass-timber cores. First, the procedure for the approvals for tall timber buildings by understanding the code compliance for Brock Commons is discussed. Then, the actual building with concrete cores is modeled, with the model being calibrated with the results from the structural engineers of record. These concrete cores are then replaced by the same configuration using Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) cores to investigate the structural feasibility of Brock Commons with a mass-timber core. The results presented herein show that Brock Commons with CLT core having the same dimensions and configuration is unstable under seismic loading for Vancouver, BC, as specified by National Building of Canada 2015. However, when the configuration and thickness of CLT cores are changed, the structure can meet the seismic performance criteria as per the code.
Online Access
Free
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Tall Cross-Laminated Timber Building: Design and Performance Session WW300 Experimental and Modeling Studies on Wood Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue618
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dolan, Daniel
Bordry, Vincent
Pei, Shiling
van de Lindt, John
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Damping
Multi-Story
Ductility
Cost
Fire Resistance
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2014
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 3-5, 2014, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is widely perceived as the most promising option for building high-rise wood structures due to its structural robustness and good fire resistance. While gravity load design of a tall CLT building is relatively easy to address because all CLT walls can be utilized as bearing walls, design for significant lateral loads (earthquake and wind) can be challenging due to the lack of ductility in current CLT construction methods that utilize wall panels with low aspect ratios (height to length). Keeping the wall panels at high aspect ratios can provide a more ductile response, but it will inevitably increase the material and labor costs associated with the structure. In this study, a solution to this dilemma is proposed by introducing damping and elastic restoring devices in a multi-story CLT building to achieve ductile response, while keeping the integrity of low aspect ratio walls to reduce the cost of construction and improve fire resistance. The design methodology for incorporating the response modification devices is proposed and the performance of the as-designed structure under seismic is evaluated.
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Payment Required
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Seismic Design and Analysis of a 20-Storey Demonstration Wood Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue667
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Chen, Zhiyong
Chui, Ying Hei
Popovski, Marjan
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Nonlinear time history analysis
Demonstration Building
Finite Element Model
Wood-Steel
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2015
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 23–25, 2015, Portland, Oregon, USA
Summary
This paper presents the seismic design and analysis of a 20-storey demonstration wood building, which was conducted as a part of the NEWBuildS tall wood building design project. A hybrid lateral load resisting system was chosen for the building. The system consisted of shear walls and a shear core, both made of structural composite lumber, connected with dowel-type connections and heavy-duty HSK (wood-steel-composite) system. The core and the shear walls were linked with horizontal steel beams at each floor. The wood-based panel-to-panel interface was designed to be the main energy dissipating mechanism of the system. A detailed finite element model of this building was developed and non-linear time history analyses were performed using 10 earthquake motions. The results showed that the seismic response of the 20-storey demonstration building met the various design criteria and the design details are appropriate.
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Accommodating Movement in High-Rise Wood-Frame Building Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1875
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Other Materials
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls

10 records – page 1 of 1.