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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Illustrated Guide for Designing Wood-Frame Buildings in Alberta to Meet the National Energy Code of Canada for Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1917
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Application
Building Envelope
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Building Codes
Energy Efficiency
Mid-Rise
Thermal
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Hygrothermal Analysis of Timber-Based External Walls Across Different Australian Climate Zones

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2071
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Walls

Carbon Footprint Benchmarking of BC Multi-Unit Residential Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2159
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems

A Comparison of the Energy Saving and Carbon Reduction Performance between Reinforced Concrete and Cross-Laminated Timber Structures in Residential Buildings in the Severe Cold Region of China

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1207
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Guo, Haibo
Liu, Ying
Meng, Yiping
Huang, Haoyu
Sun, Cheng
Shao, Yu
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Energy Consumption
Carbon Emissions
Residential
Severe Cold Regions
Simulation
Reinforced Concrete
Life-Cycle Assessment
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Sustainability
ISSN
2071-1050
Summary
This paper aims to investigate the energy saving and carbon reduction performance of cross-laminated timber residential buildings in the severe cold region of China through a computational simulation approach. The authors selected Harbin as the simulation environment, designed reference residential buildings with different storeys which were constructed using reinforced concrete (RC) and cross-laminated timber (CLT) systems, then simulated the energy performance using the commercial software IESTM and finally made comparisions between the RC and CLT buildings. The results show that the estimated energy consumption and carbon emissions for CLT buildings are 9.9% and 13.2% lower than those of RC buildings in view of life-cycle assessment. This indicates that the CLT construction system has good potential for energy saving when compared to RC in the severe cold region of China. The energy efficiency of residential buildings is closely related to the height for both RC and CLT buildings. In spite of the higher cost of materials for high-rise buildings, both RC and CLT tall residential buildings have better energy efficiency than low-rise and mid-rise buildings in the severe cold region of China.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Climate Effects of Forestry and Substitution of Concrete Buildings and Fossil Energy

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2774
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Gustavsson, L.
Nguyen, T.
Sathre, Roger
Tettey, U.Y.A.
Publisher
Elsevier
Year of Publication
2021
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Climate Change
Modular Construction
Carbon Emissions
Forest Management
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews
Summary
Forests can help mitigate climate change in different ways, such as by storing carbon in forest ecosystems, and by producing a renewable supply of material and energy products. We analyse the climate implications of different scenarios for forestry, bioenergy and wood construction. We consider three main forestry scenarios for Kronoberg County in Sweden, over a 201-year period. The Business-as-usual scenario mirrors today's forestry while in the Production scenario the forest productivity is increased by 40% through more intensive forestry. In the Set-aside scenario 50% of forest land is set-aside for conservation. The Production scenario results in less net carbon dioxide emissions and cumulative radiative forcing compared to the other scenarios, after an initial period of 30–35 years during which the Set-aside scenario has less emissions. In the end of the analysed period, the Production scenario yields strong emission reductions, about ten times greater than the initial reduction in the Set-aside scenario. Also, the Set-aside scenario has higher emissions than Business-as-usual after about 80 years. Increasing the harvest level of slash and stumps results in climate benefits, due to replacement of more fossil fuel. Greatest emission reduction is achieved when biomass replaces coal, and when modular timber buildings are used. In the long run, active forestry with high harvest and efficient utilisation of biomass for replacement of carbon-intensive non-wood products and fuels provides significant climate mitigation, in contrast to setting aside forest land to store more carbon in the forest and reduce the harvest of biomass.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

High-Rise Wood Building Enclosures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2349
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope

Guide for Wind-Vibration Design of Wood-Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue379
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Hu, Lin
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Wind
Keywords
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Dynamic Properties
Ambient Vibration Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
It is not surprising to see a rapid growth in the demand for mid- to high-rise buildings. Traditionally, these types of buildings have been dominated by steel and concrete. This trend creates a great opportunity for wood to expand its traditional single and low-rise multi-family building market to the growing mid- to high-rise building market. The significance and importance of wood construction to environmental conservation and the Canadian economy has been recognized by governments, the building industry, architects, design engineers, builders and clients. It is expected that more and more tall wood frame buildings of 6- to 8-storeys (or taller) will be constructed in Canada. Before we can push for use of wood in such applications, however, several barriers to wood success in its traditional and potential market places have to be removed. Lack of knowledge of the dynamic properties of mid- to high-rise wood and hybrid wood buildings and their responses to wind, and absence of current guidelines for wind vibration design of mid- to high-rise wood and hybrid wood buildings are examples of such barriers.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

VaproShield Mass Timber Building Enclosure Design Guide

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2347
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Author
Brown, Bailey
Finch, Graham
DiPlacido, Adam
Organization
RDH Building Science
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mass Timber
Air Barrier Membrane
Roof Underlayments
Enclosure Design
Water-Resistive Barrier
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Mass timber and CLT construction offers many advantages, such as enhanced modularity, reduced construction schedules, improved thermal performance, and material sustainability. However, mass timber’s propensity to absorb moisture from the environment and the relative vapor impermeability of CLT panels introduces unique challenges when incorporated with the building enclosure. These challenges should be considered during design and construction phases to ensure long-term performance. The VaproShield Mass Timber Building Enclosure Design Guideline covers the best practices for the design and construction of high-performance CLT wall and roof assemblies. RDH is the principal author and editor of the guide and within its capacity, we do not purport to endorse any specific material or technical matter within this guide.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Tall Wood Building Enclosures – A Race To the Top

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2346
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Site Construction Management
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Author
Hubbs, Brian
Finch, Graham
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Design and Systems
Site Construction Management
Keywords
Prefabrication
Building Enclosure
Façade
Curtain Wall
Durability
Construction Time
Language
English
Conference
Canadian Conference on Building Science and Technology
Research Status
Complete
Summary
On tall wood buildings, mass timber elements including CLT, NLT, glulam, and other engineered components absolutely need to be protected from excessive wetting during construction. This requirement precludes the use of many conventional cladding systems unless the building is fully hoarded during construction. The building enclosure and façade of UBC Tallwood House consists of an innovative prefabricated steel stud rainscreen curtain-wall assembly that is pre-insulated, pre-clad, and has factory installed windows. Design of connections and air and water sealing of panel joints and interfaces was carefully considered given the tall wood structure they were designed to protect. While steel studs were utilized in the panelized structure, feasible curtain-wall designs were also developed and prototyped for wood-framing, CLT, and precast concrete as part of the project. Looking ahead, there will continue to be innovation in design and construction of fast and durable facades for taller wood buildings. New prefabricated panel designs incorporating CLT panels and connection technologies from unitized curtainwall systems are already being developed for the “next tallest” wood buildings in North America.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Construction Cost Analysis of High-performance Multi-unit Residential Buidlings in British Columbia

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2792
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Cost
Energy Performance
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Zero Emissions Building Exchange
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Energy Performance
Keywords
BC Energy Step Code
Net Zero Energy Ready
Mid-Rise
Passive House
Construction Cost
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Does it really cost more to build a high-performance building? Historically, this question has been addressed with theoretical studies based on varying the design of common building archetypes, but nothing beats the real thing. ZEBx, in partnership with BTY Group and seven builders from across BC, has completed a cost analysis of seven high-performance, wood-framed, mid-rise, multi-unit residential buildings that meet Step 4 of the Energy Step Code or the Passive House standard. The results of the study may surprise you!
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.