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Modeling the Impact of Assembly Tolerances Regarding Air Leaks on the Energy Efficiency and Durability of a Cross-Laminated Timber Structure

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2365
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Martin, Ulysse
Blanchet, Pierre
Potvin, André
Publisher
North Carolina State University
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Keywords
Energy Efficiency
Air Leakage
HAM Analysis
Durability Assessment
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
BioResources
Summary
Air leaks have a considerable impact on the energy load and durability of buildings, particularly in cold climates. In wood construction using cross-laminated timber (CLT), air leaks are most likely to be concentrated at the joints between panels and other elements. This study used simulations of heat, air, and moisture transfers through a gap between two CLT panels causing air leakage in winter conditions under a cold climate. A real leakage occurrence was sized to validate the simulations. The aim of this work was to assess the impact on the energy loads and the durability of an air leak, as either infiltration or exfiltration, for different gap widths and relative humidity levels. The results showed that infiltrations had a greater impact on the energy load than exfiltrations but did not pose a threat to the durability, as opposed to exfiltrations. Gap sizes in CLT may vary, but the effect on the energy load was sensitive to the leakage path in the rest of the wall. As expected, a combination of winter exfiltration and a high level of interior relative humidity was particularly detrimental.
Online Access
Free
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Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Timber-Glass Shear Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1763
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Energy Performance
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Glass Composite
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Frangež, Rok
Ber, Boštjan
Premrov, Miroslav
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Glass Composite
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Energy Performance
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Load Bearing Capacity
Mechanical Tests
Racking Resistance
Adhesives
Polyurethane
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 5191-5198
Summary
Building large-sized glazing into timber walls has significantly grown over the last years, however when combined, the structural behaviour of both elements can be rather complicated. This is one of the major reasons for this investigation. In order to design energy-efficient timber-frame buildings with enlarged fixed glazing, it is of primary...
Online Access
Free
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Mass Timber Design Manual

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2780
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Cost
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Fire
General Information
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
WoodWorks
Think Wood
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Connections
Cost
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Environmental Impact
Fire
General Information
Moisture
Keywords
Mass Timber
United States
Building Systems
Tall Wood
Sustainability
IBC
Applications
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This manual is helpful for experts and novices alike. Whether you’re new to mass timber or an early adopter you’ll benefit from its comprehensive summary of the most up to date resources on topics from mass timber products and applications to tall wood construction and sustainability. The manual’s content includes WoodWorks technical papers, Think Wood continuing education articles, case studies, expert Q&As, technical guides and other helpful tools. Click through to view each individual resource or download the master resource folder for all files in one handy location. For your convenience, this book will be updated annually as mass timber product development and the market are quickly evolving.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Solutions for Upper Mid-Rise and High-Rise Mass Timber Construction: High Energy Performance Six-Storey Wood-Frame Building: Field Monitoring

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2599
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Indoor Environmental Conditions
Durability
Vertical Movement
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This monitoring study was initiated to collect performance data from a highly energy efficient, six-storey building located in the coastal climate of British Columbia. This work focuses on the following objectives by installing sensors during the construction: · To provide information about the indoor environment of a highly energy efficient building · To provide field data about the durability performance of an innovative high energy efficiency exterior wall solution for mid-rise wood-frame construction · To provide information on the amounts of vertical movement in wood-frame exterior walls and interior walls below a roof/roof deck
Online Access
Free
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Costing Analysis for Common Mass-timber Archetypes

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2812
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Building Envelope
Organization
Morrison Hershield
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Building Envelope
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Keywords
Parametric Design
Cost
Mass Timber
Building Code
BC Energy Step Code
National Energy Code of Canada for Buildings
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Eric Wood at Morrison Hershfield
Summary
The project develops building archetypes, cost data and energy modelling to allow users to cost out mass timber buildings from basic, code-compliant buildings to high-performing, energy-efficient, low-emitting buildings. It will help quantity surveyors, designers, and other decisionmakers undertake business-case development by clarifying cost variables associated with mass-timber construction.
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Use of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) in Industrial Buildings in Nordic Climate — A Case Study

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2352
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Design of an Energy-Efficient and Cost-Effective Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) House in Waikuku Beach, New Zealand

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2364
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bournique, Guillaume
Publisher
KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Sweden
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Energy Performance
Keywords
Energy Efficiency
Cost-Competitive
Residential
Housing
Energy Consumption
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The Canterbury earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 caused significant damage to the Christchurch building stock. However, it is an opportunity to build more comfortable and energy efficient buildings. Previous research suggests a tendency to both under heat and spot heat, meaning that New Zealand dwellings are partly heated and winter indoor temperatures do not always meet the recommendations of the World Health Organization. Those issues are likely to be explained by design deficiency, poor thermal envelope, and limitations of heating systems. In that context, the thesis investigates the feasibility of building an energy efficient and cost-competitive house in Christchurch. Although capital costs for an energy efficient house are inevitably higher, they are balanced with lower operating costs and improved thermal comfort. The work is supported by a residential building project using Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. This atypical project is compared with a typical New Zealand house (reference building), regarding both energy efficiency and costs. The current design of the CLT building is discussed according to passive design strategies, and a range of improvements for the building design is proposed. This final design proposal is determined by prioritizing investments in design options having the greatest effect on the building overall energy consumption. Building design features include windows efficiencies, insulation levels, optimized thermal mass, lighting fixture, as well as HVAC and domestic hot water systems options. The improved case for the CLT building is simulated having a total energy consumption of 4,860kWh/year, which corresponds to a remarkable 60% energy savings over the baseline. The construction cost per floor area is slightly higher for the CLT building, about 2,900$/m² against 2,500$/m² for the timber framed house. But a life cycle cost analysis shows that decreased operating costs makes the CLT house cost-competitive over its lifetime. The thesis suggests that the life cycle cost of the CLT house is 14% less than that of the reference building, while the improved CLT design reaches about 22% costs savings.
Online Access
Free
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Timber Based Prefabricated Single Modular Housing: A Brief Comparison to the Auto Industry

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2137
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Multifunctional Composite Wall Elements for Multistory Buildings Made of Timber and Wood-Based Lightweight Concrete

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1520
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Walls
Author
Fadai, Alireza
Radlherr, Christoph
Setoodeh Jahromy, Sepehr
Winter, Wolfgang
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Walls
Topic
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Keywords
Lightweight Concrete
Energy Efficiency
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 613-622
Summary
This paper aims to discuss timber-wood lightweight concrete composites for application in wall components for buildings. The aim is to develop a multi-layer wall system composed of wood lightweight concrete, connected timber sections to gain and use advantages of each used material – lightweight, structural, thermal storage and insulation, ecological and economic benefits – to name the most important ones. The development of timber-wood lightweight concrete composites systems will lead to a new generation of polyvalent multi-material building components. By using renewable resources, waste products of the forest industry, and manufactured wood products, this technology provides statically and energy-efficient components for low-energy constructions. Such products support rapid-assembly construction methods, which use prefabricated dry elements to increase the efficiency of the construction. Wood-based alternatives to conventional concrete or masonry construction also open opportunities to reduce the carbon emissions.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Wood Innovation Research Laboratory (WIRL) Building Research Report

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2577
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Building Envelope
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Keywords
Performance
Sensors
Testing Methods
Energy Consumption
Thermal Performance
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The purpose of this research is to investigate what differences, if any, exist between the modeled energy consumption and building envelope performance of the Wood Innovation Research Laboratory (WIRL) building following eight months of in-situ data collection. The WIRL building was completed in July of 2018 by the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) and is located in Prince George, British Columbia. Built in partnership with the Province of British Columbia, the building was designed to meet Passive House standards, a building certification system that requires the building to have low energy input requirements due to high levels of thermal insulation and minimal air leakage. To ensure the building achieves the established energy use targets set forth under the Passive House certification system, a computer model of the proposed building design must be completed prior to the start of construction using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) software. Inputs to the model include envelope design, mechanical energy use, building location and airtightness value. Key outputs included the predicted annual heating demand (kWh/m2a), total primary energy demand (kWh/m2a), and air tightness of the building envelope (ACH@50Pa). Based on the final building design model and test results achieved following completion, the WIRL building was deemed to have met all Passive House requirements and certification was achieved. To complete on-going data collection of the in-situ performance of the WIRL building, temperature and humidity sensors were installed in two of the exterior wall assemblies and the building’s floor. In addition, gas and electrical energy use meters were installed to monitor the building’s energy consumption. The installation of all equipment was made possible by Forest Innovation Investment through their 2018/2019 Wood First Program.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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10 records – page 1 of 1.