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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Experimental Investigation of Wall-To-Floor Connections in Post-Tensioned Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue60
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Moroder, Daniel
Sarti, Francesco
Palermo, Alessandro
Pampanin, Stefano
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Connections
Damage
Lateral Loads
Post-Tensioned
Pres-Lam
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
March 21-23, 2014, Auckland, New Zealand
Summary
Rocking timber walls provide an excellent lateral load resisting system for structures using the low damage seismic design philosophy. Special attention has to be given to the wall-to-floor connections, because diaphragm forces have to be properly transferred while accommodating displacement incompatibilities, which include the relative rotation and the uplift of the wall with respect to the floor. This paper presents the experimental behaviour of several different wall-to-floor connections in Pres-Lam post-tensioned timber structures subjected to horizontal seismic loading. A 2/3 scale post-tensioned timber wall was laterally loaded through collector beams using different connection details. Bolted connections take advantage of the flexibility of the fasteners and lead to some bending of the collector beam, whereas pins and slotted steel plates reduce the wall-tofloor interaction, as they allow for rotation and some uplift. No significant damage to the floors was observed in any of the tests. The experimental results showed that floor damage can generally be prevented up to high levels of drift by the flexibility of well-designed connections and the flexibility of the collector beams. In the case of very stiff floors or very stiff collector beams, a more sophisticated connection such as sliding steel elements with a vertical slot should be considered.
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Response of Plywood-Coupled Post-Tensioned LVL Walls to Repeated Seismic Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1583
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Pampanin, Stefano
Fragiacomo, Massimo
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Quasi-Static
Cyclic Testing
Energy Dissipation
Nails
Cyclic Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1807-1813
Summary
Laminated veneer lumber (LVL) structural members have recently been proposed for multi-storey timber buildings based on ongoing research at University of Canterbury, New Zealand. The members are designed with unbonded post-tensioning for recentering and energy dissipation through the ductile connections. This paper describes the experimental and numerical investigation of post-tensioned LVL walls coupled with plywood sheets, under quasistatic cyclic testing protocols. It is observed that energy is dissipated mostly through yielding of the nails, and the LVL walls return close to their initial position while remaining virtually undamaged. The same specimen has been tested under repeated cyclic loading to investigate the performance of the arrangement under more than one seismic event (a major earthquake followed by a significant aftershock). Different nail spacing and arrangements have been tested to compare their energy dissipation characteristics. The results indicate good seismic performance, characterized by negligible damage of the structural members and very small residual deformations. The only component significantly damaged is the nailed connection between the plywood sheet and the LVL walls. Although the nails yield and there is a reduction in stiffness the system exhibits a stable performance without any major degradation throughout the loading regime. The plywood can be easily removed and replaced with new sheets after an earthquake, which are reasonably cheap and easy to install, allowing for major reduction in downtime. With these additional benefits the concept has potential for consideration as an alternative solution for multi-storey timber buildings.
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Seismic Performance of a Post-Tensioned LVL Building Subjected to the Canterbury Earthquake Sequence

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue157
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Frames
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Smith, Tobias
Carradine, David
Pampanin, Stefano
Ditommaso, Rocco
Carlo Ponzo, Felice
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Frames
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Post-Tensioning
Quasi-Static
Dynamic
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 13-15, 2012, Christchurch, New Zealand
Summary
The following paper presents the seismic performance of a two storey post-tensioned Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) building during the aftershock sequence following the MW 6.3 Canterbury earthquake that occurred on 22nd February 2011. Composed of post-tensioned walls in one direction and post-tensioned frames in the other, the structure under analysis was originally tested quasi-statically in the structural laboratories of the University of Canterbury (UoC), Christchurch, New Zealand. Following testing the building was demounted and reassembled as the offices of the STIC (Structural Timber Innovation Company) research consortium on the UoC campus with several significant changes being made to convert the building from its initial use as a test specimen into a functioning office structure.
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Timber Core-Walls for Lateral Load Resistance of Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1858
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Dunbar, Andrew
Moroder, Daniel
Pampanin, Stefano
Buchanan, Andrew
Publisher
New Zealand Timber Design Society
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Pres-Lam
Earthquake
Post-Tensioned
Core-Walls
Multi-Storey
Panels
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
New Zealand Timber Design Journal
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Design and Construction of Prestressed Timber Buildings for Seismic Areas

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1847
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Seismic Design Options for Post-Tensioned Timber Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1853
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Author
Iqbal, Asif
Pampanin, Stefano
Palermo, Alessandro
Buchanan, Andrew
Fragiacomo, Massimo
Publisher
New Zealand Timber Design Society
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Earthquake
Post-Tensioned
Energy Dissipation
Multi-Storey
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
New Zealand Timber Design Journal
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Design of Floor Diaphragms in Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue294
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Floors
Author
Moroder, Daniel
Smith, Tobias
Pampanin, Stefano
Palermo, Alessandro
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Diaphragms
Multi-Storey
Commercial
Lateral Loads
Equivalent Truss Method
Lateral Load Resisting System
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 10-12, 2015, Rotorua, New Zealand
Summary
This paper discusses the design of timber diaphragms, in response to the growing interest in multi-storey commercial timber structures, and the lack of guidance or regulations regarding the seismic design of timber diaphragms. Proper performance of floor diaphragms is required to transfer all lateral loads to the vertical systems that resist them, but design for earthquake loads can be more complex than design for wind loads. This paper confirms that the seismic design of a diaphragm is intimately linked to the seismic design of the whole building. Diaphragm failure, even if restricted to a limited diaphragm portion, can compromise the behaviour of the whole building. It is therefore necessary to design and detail diaphragms for all possible load paths and to evaluate their influence on the load distribution within the rest of the structure. It is strongly recommended that timber diaphragms be designed as elastic elements, by applying dynamic amplification and overstrength factors derived from the lateral load resisting system. This paper shows that some current design recommendations for plywood sheathing on light timber framing can be applied to massive wood diaphragms, but for more complex floor geometries an equivalent truss method is suggested. Diaphragm flexibility and displacement incompatibilities between the floor diaphragms and the lateral resisting systems also need to be accounted for.
Online Access
Free
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Design and Testing of Post-Tensioned Timber Wall Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue696
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Author
Sarti, Francesco
Palermo, Alessandro
Pampanin, Stefano
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Multi-Storey
Pres-Lam
Energy Dissipation
Quasi-Static Test
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
The paper presents the design and detailing, and the experimental quasi-static 2/3 scale tests of two posttensioned wall systems: a single (more traditional) wall system (Figure 2) and a new configuration comprising of a column-wall-column coupled system (Figure 3). The latter allows avoiding displacement incompatibilities issues between the wall and the diaphragm by using the boundary columns as supports.
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Free
Resource Link
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Seismic Design of Floor Diaphragms in Post-Tensioned Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue507
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Moroder, Daniel
Sarti, Francesco
Palermo, Alessandro
Pampanin, Stefano
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Frame Elongation
Rocking
Diaphragm
Lateral Load Resisting System
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Seismic damage to floor diaphragms because of displacement incompatibilities are a point of concern in many structures. This paper studies the behaviour of timber diaphragms subjected to frame elongation and rocking of walls in post-tensioned timber buildings. Experimental tests with special connection details between floor panels and between the diaphragm and the lateral load resisting system show that floor damage in severe earthquakes can be avoided by designing for flexibility and proper connection detailing
Online Access
Free
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Seismic Design of Core-Walls for Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue134
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shafts and Chases
Author
Dunbar, Andrew
Pampanin, Stefano
Palermo, Alessandro
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shafts and Chases
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Multi-Storey
Prefabrication
Pres-Lam
Residential
Quasi-Static Loading
Energy Dissipation
U-Shaped Flexural Plates
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 26-28, 2013, Wellington, New Zealand
Summary
This paper describes options for seismic design of pre-fabricated timber core-wall systems, used as stairwells and lift shafts for lateral load resistance in multi-storey timber buildings. The use of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels for multi-storey timber buildings is gaining popularity throughout the world, especially for residential construction. This paper describes the possible use of CLT core-walls for seismic resistance in open-plan commercial office buildings in New Zealand. Previous experimental testing at the University of Canterbury has been done on the in-plane behaviour of single and coupled Pres-Lam post-tensioned timber walls. However there has been very little research done on the behaviour of timber walls that are orthogonal to each other and no research into CLT walls in the post-tensioned Pres-Lam system. This paper describes the proposed test regime and design detailing of two half-scale twostorey CLT stairwells to be tested under a bi-directional quasi-static loading. The test specimens will include a half-flight stair case with landings within the stairwell. The “High seismic option” consists of post-tensioned CLT walls coupled with energy dissipating U-shaped Flexural Plates (UFP) attached between wall panels and square hollow section steel columns at the corner junctions. An alternative “Low seismic option” uses the same post-tensioned CLT panels, with no corner columns or UFPs. The panels will be connected by screws to provide a semi-rigid connection, allowing relative movement between the panels producing some level of energy dissipation.
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10 records – page 1 of 1.