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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Modeling the Coupling Effect of CLT Connections Under Bi-Axial Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2366
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Liu, Jingjing
Lam, Frank
Foschi, Ricardo
Li, Minghao
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Coupling Effect
Biaxial loading
Degradation
Modeling
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Structural Engineering
Summary
This paper presents the modeling of coupling effect of tension and shear loading on Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) connections using a finite element based algorithm called HYST. The model idealizes the connections as a “Pseudo Nail” - elastoplastic beam elements (the nail) surrounded by compression-only spring elements (steel sheath and wood embedment). A gap size factor and an unloading stiffness degradation index of the spring elements under cyclic loading were integrated into the optimized HYST algorithm to consider the coupling effect. The model was calibrated to compare with 32 configurations of CLT angle bracket and hold-down connections tests: in tension with co-existent constant shear force, and in shear with co-existent tension force. The results showed that the proposed model can fully capture the coupling effect of typical CLT connections, considering strength degradation, unloading and reloading stiffness degradation, and pinching effect. The model provided a useful tool for nailbased timber connections and a mechanism-based explanation to understand the hysteretic behaviour of CLT connections under bi-axial loading.
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Experimental Test of Cross Laminated Timber Connections Under Bi-Directional Loading

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1551
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Shear Walls
Author
Liu, Jingjing
Lam, Frank
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Shear
Tension
Angle Bracket
Hold-Down
Monotonic Tests
Cyclic Tests
Rocking Walls
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1223-1232
Summary
This paper presents results of an experimental study of commonly used angle bracket and hold-down connections in Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) wall systems under bi-directional loading. Monotonic and cyclic tests of the connections were carried out in one direction, while different levels of constant force were simultaneously applied in a perpendicular direction. The experiment aims to consider the combined and coupling effect of loads for connections in a rocking CLT shear wall system. Key mechanical characteristics of those connections were calculated, evaluated and discussed. The results show that shear and tension actions for hold-downs are quite independent but strongly coupled for angle brackets. The study gives a better understanding of hysteretic behaviour of CLT connections, and provides reliable data for future numerical analysis of CLT structures.
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Connections for Stackable Heavy Timber Modules in Midrise to Tall Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2087
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Modular
Intra-module Connection
Inter-module Vertical Connection
Inter-module horizontal Connection
Mid-Rise
Tall Wood
Screws
Load Transfer
Steel Angle Bracket
Stiffness
Strength
Ductility
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In Phase I (2018-19) of this project on Prefabricated Heavy Timber Modular Construction, three major types of connections used in a stackable modular building were studied: intramodule connection, inter-module vertical connection, and inter-module horizontal connection. The load requirement and major design criteria were identified...
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Torque Loading Tests on the Rolling Shear Strength of Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1416
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Lam, Frank
Li, Yuan
Li, Minghao
Publisher
Springer Japan
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Japan
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Rolling Shear Strength
Polyurethane
Mountain Pine Beetle
Torque Loading Tests
Failure Modes
Monte Carlo
Finite Element Model
Brittle Failure
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Wood Science
ISSN
1611-4663
Summary
In this study , torque loading tests on small shear blocks were performed to evaluate the rolling shear strength of cross-laminated timber (CLT). The CLT plates in the tests were manufactured with Mountain Pine Beetle-afflicted lumber boards and glued with polyurethane adhesive; two types of layups (five-layer and three-layer) with a clamping pressure 0.4 MPa were studied. The small block specimens were sampled from full-size CLT plates and the cross layers were processed to have an annular cross section. These specimens were tested under torque loading until brittle shear failure occurred in the middle cross layers. Based on the test results, the brittle shear failure in the specimens was evaluated by detailed finite element models to confirm the observed failure mode was rolling shear. Furthermore, a Monte Carlo simulation procedure was performed to investigate the occurrence probability of different shear failure modes in the tests considering the randomness of the rolling shear strength and longitudinal shear strength properties in the wood material. The result also suggested the probability of rolling shear failure is very high, which gives more confident proof that the specimens failed dominantly in rolling shear. It was also found that the torque loading test method yielded different rolling shear strength values compared to the previous research from short-span beam bending tests; such a difference may mainly be due to the different stressed volumes of material under different testing methods, which can be further investigated using the size effect theory in the future.
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Compression Perpendicular to Grain Behavior for the Design of a Prefabricated CLT Facade Horizontal Joint

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1540
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Gasparri, Eugenia
Lam, Frank
Liu, Yingyang
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Keywords
Envelope
Joints
Self-Tapping Screws
Finite Element Analysis
Prefabricated
Vertical Loads
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1088-1098
Summary
The present work aims to define horizontal joint dimension tolerances for newly proposed prefabricated façade systems for applications in tall cross laminated timber (CLT) buildings based on the compression perpendicular to grain characteristics of the component. This requires a thorough understanding of structural settlement under vertical loads which can vary at each floor height. An experimental program has been carried out with reference to the case of a platform frame building construction, where major perpendicular to grain compression of the floor can occur under high loads. Five-layer CLT specimens have been tested under compression via the application of a line load with steel plate as well as actual CLT wall specimens. Strengthening contribution using full threaded self-tapping wood screws has also been investigated. Results of deformation characteristics have been validated through a non-linear finite element analysis and further elaborated in order to outline implications in the design of a prefabricated façade.
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Lateral Behaviour of Cross Laminated Timber Shear Walls under Reversed Cyclic Loads

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue198
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Li, Minghao
Lam, Frank
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Australia
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Language
English
Conference
Pacific Conference on Earthquake Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
November 6-8, 2015, Sydney, Australia
Summary
Cross laminated timber (CLT) shear walls typically consist of solid engineered timber panels connected by metal hardware such as hold-downs, angle-brackets and others. Under seismic loads, the panel elements deform mainly in a rocking mode coupled with a sliding mode and small amount of in-plane bending/shear deformations. The connection system normally governs the lateral behaviour of CLT shear walls. This paper presents a finite element wall model CLTWALL2D to study CLT shear wall behaviour. The model consists of elastic orthotropic plate elements for the panels and nonlinear spring elements for the connections. Contact elements are also used for the panel-to-panel interactions. The nonlinear spring properties are represented by a subroutine called HYST that is able to model the strength and stiffness degradation and the pinching effect commonly observed in timber connections. The HYST parameters are calibrated by experimental data of CLT connections and embedded to the CLTWALL2D model. The wall model is validated against experimental data of a CLT shear wall test database. Parametric studies are then carried out to study the influence of gravity loads and vertical connection densities on the wall behaviour in terms of strength, stiffness, ductility, and energy dissipation.
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Connection and Performance of Two-Way CLT Plates

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1482
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Two-Way
Bending Test
Modulus of Elasticity
Self-Tapping Screws
Glued-In-Rod
Steel Connectors
Steel Plates
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The two-way action of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) is often ignored in the design of CLT due to its complexity. But in some cases, for example, large span timber floor/roof, the benefit of taking the two-way action into account may be considerable since it is often deflection controlled in the design. Furthermore CLT panels are typically limited to widths of less than 3 m. therefore, for practical applications, engaging CLT panels in two-way action as a plate in bending would require connecting two panels in the width/minor direction to take out-of-plane loading. To address this technically difficult situation, an innovative connection was developed to join the CLT panels in the minor direction to form a large continuous two-way plate. The two-way action of CLT was also quantified. Static bending test was conducted on CLT panels in the major and minor directions to measure the Modulus of Elasticity (MOE). This provided a benchmark for the following connection test, and data for the future development of computer modeling. The average apparent MOE was 9.09 GPa in the major direction and 2.37 GPa in the minor direction. Several connection techniques were considered and tested, including self-tapping wood screws, glued in steel rods, and steel connectors. One connecting system was found to be effective. For the panel configuration considered, the system was consisted of steel plates, self-tapping wood screws, and 45° screw washers. Two steel plates were placed on the tension side with sixteen screws, and one steel plates was placed on the compression side with four screws. When the screws were driven into the wood, the screws were tightly locked with the washers and steel plates, and at the same time, the wood members were pulled together by the screws. This eliminated any original gap within the connection. The connector was installed to join two CLT members in the minor direction. They were tested under bending with the same setup as above. The connected panels had an average apparent MOE of 2.37 GPa, and an average shear-free MOE of 2.44 GPa, both of which were higher than the counterpart in the full panels. The moment capacity of the connected panels was also high. The minimum moment capacity was 3.2 times the design value. Two large CLT panels were tested under concentrated loading with four corners simply supported. The deflection of nine locations within the panels was measured. This data will be used to validate the computer modeling for CLT two-way action.
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Connection and Performance of Two-Way CLT Plates Phase II

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2086
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Zhang, Chao
Asselstine, Julian
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Deflection
Two-Way
Bending
Finite Element Method
Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In Phase I of Developing Large Span Two Way CLT Floor System (2017-18) we studied the performance of a steel plate connection system for the minor direction of CLT plates. The connected specimens had higher stiffness and strength compared to intact members under bending. In Phase II (2018-19) we designed and tested another connector based on...
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Development of Mass Timber Wall System Based on Nail Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2526
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
Timber Engineering and Applied Mechanics (TEAM) Laboratory
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Shear
Stiffness
Fasteners
Fastener Type
Load
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project studied the feasibility and performance of a mass timber wall system based on Nail Laminated Timber (NLT) for floor/wall applications, in order to quantify the effects of various design parameters. Thirteen 2.4 m × 2.4 m shear walls were manufactured and tested in this phase. Together with another five specimens tested before, a total eighteen shear wall specimens and ten configurations were investigated. The design variables included fastener type, sheathing thickness, number of sheathings, sheathing material, nailing pattern, wall opening, and lumber orientation. The NLT walls were made of SprucePine-Fir (SPF) No. 2 2×4 (38 mm × 89 mm) lumber and Oriented Strand Lumber (OSB) or plywood sheathing. They were tested under monotonic and reverse-cyclic loading protocols, in accordance with ASTM E564-06 (2018) and ASTM E2126-19, respectively. Compared to traditional wood stud walls, the best performing NLT based shear wall had 2.5 times the peak load and 2 times the stiffness at 0.5-1.5% drift, while retaining high ductility. The advantage of these NLT-based wall was even greater under reverse-cyclic loading due to the internal energy dissipation of NLT. The wall with ring nails had higher stiffness than the one with smooth nails. But the performance of ring nails deteriorated drastically under reverse-cyclic loading, leading to a considerably lower capacity. Changing the sheathing thickness from 11 mm to 15 mm improved the strength by 6% while having the same initial stiffness. Adding one more face of sheathing increased the peak load and stiffness by at least 50%. The wall was also very ductile as the load dropped less than 10% when the lateral displacement exceeded 150 mm. The difference created by sheathing material was not significant if they were of the same thickness. Reducing the nailing spacing by half led to a 40% increasing in the peak load and stiffness. Having an opening of 25% of the area at the center, the lateral capacity and stiffness reached 75% or more of the full wall. A simplified method to estimate the lateral resistance of this mass timber wall system was proposed. The estimate was close to the tested capacity and was on the conservative side. Recommendations for design and manufacturing the system were also presented.
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Developing a Large Span Timber-based Composite Floor System for Highrise Office Buildings Phase I

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2803
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Box Girder
Timber Composite Floor
Span
High-Rise
Tall Wood Buildings
Stiffness
Composite Action
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project proposes a timber-based composite floor that can span 12 m and be used in the construction of 40+ story office buildings. This floor system integrates timber panels and timber beams to form a continuous box girder structure. The timber panels function as the flanges and the timber beams as the web. The beams are spaced and connected to the flange panels so that sufficient bending stiffness of a 12 m span can be achieved via the development of composite action. The current phase of this project studied the performance of the connections between timber elements in the proposed composite member. Six types of connections using different flange material and connection techniques were tested: Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), Laminated Strand Lumber (LSL), Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL), and Post Laminated Veneer Lumber (PLVL). Glulam was used as the web. The majority of the connections used self-tapping wood screws except one had notches. The load-carrying capacity, stiffness, and ductility of the connections were measured. The stiffness of CLT, LSL, and PLVL connections was in the same range, 19-20 kN/mm per screw. Amongst the three, LSL had the highest peak load and PLVL had the highest proportional limit. The stiffness of the two LVL screw connections was around 13 kN/mm. The notched LVL connection had significantly higher stiffness than the rest, and its peak load was in the same range as LSL, but the failure was brittle. LVL was used to manufacture the full scale timber composite floor element. With a spacing of 400 mm, the overall stiffness reached 33689 N
mm2×109, which was 2.5 times the combined stiffness of two Glulam beams. The predicted overall stiffness based on Gamma method was within 5% of the tested value, and the estimated degree of composite action was 68%. From both the test results and analytical modeling, the number of screws may be further reduced to 50% or less of the current amount, while maintaining a high level of stiffness. Future work includes testing the composite floor under different screw spacings, investigating the effect of concrete topping, and the connections between floor members and other structural elements.
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10 records – page 1 of 1.