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Addendum to RR-335: Sound Transmission Through Nail-Laminated Timber (NLT) Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1868
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls

Sound Insulation Performance of Elevator Shaft Walls built with Nail-Laminated Timber Panels - Exploratory Tests and Preliminary Results

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue364
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shafts and Chases
Author
Pirvu, Ciprian
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shafts and Chases
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Building Codes
Canada
Sound Insulation
Apparent Sound Insulation Class
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
As 6-storey wood-frame, massive-timber and hybrid wood buildings are increasingly accepted by more jurisdictions across Canada, there is a need to develop reliable elevator shaft designs that meet the minimum structural, fire, and sound requirements in building codes. Elevator shaft walls constructed with wood-based materials have the advantages of material compatibility, use of sustainable materials, and ease of construction. In this exploratory study, selected elevator shaft wall designs built with nail-laminated-timber (NLT) structural elements were tested to investigate their sound insulation performance because little is known about the sound insulation performance of such wall assemblies. The tests were carried out in an acoustic mock-up facility in accordance to standard requirements, and provide preliminary data on the sound insulation performance of elevator shaft walls built with NLT panels. Four different elevator shaft walls built with NLT panels were tested and their measured apparent sound insulation class (ASTC) ratings ranged from 18 to 39 depending on their construction details. Some of the reasons that may have contributed to the ASTC ratings obtained for the elevator shaft walls described in this report as well as recommendations for future designs were provided. It is recommended to continue improving the sound insulation of elevator shaft walls built with NLT panels to meet or exceed the minimum requirements in building codes.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Vibration and Sound Insulation Performance of Mass Timber Floors with Concrete Toppings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2548
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Ceilings
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Ceilings
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Concrete Topping
Acoustic Membrane
Exposed Mass Timber Elements
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Jianhui Zhou at the University of Northern British Columbia
Summary
The impact sound perceived in the lower volume in a building is radiated by the vibration of the ceiling transmitted from the vibration of the floor generated by an impact source in the upper volume. Thus, the dynamic behaviour of a floor is one crucial intermediate step to understand the impact sound insulation performance of such a floor. A key to reducing the impact sound is to isolate the structural floor from the subfloor. Floating floor construction is a common way of improving the impact sound insulation, which is to float a concrete topping on the mass timber floor with an elastic layer in between. There are two types of floating floor solutions, a) with a continuous elastic layer and b) with point bearing elastic mounts as shown in Figure 1. This study will investigate both solutions and will provide guidance on how to adopt both solutions for mass timber floors with an exposed ceiling. The objectives of this project are: 1. To measure the sound insulation performance of mass timber floors with full-scale concrete topping on various continuous elastic interlayer materials 2. To measure the sound insulation performance of mass timber floors with full-scale concrete topping on discrete elastic load mounts
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Apparent Sound Insulation in Mass Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2616
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Author
Mahn, Jeffrey
Quirt, David
Mueller-Trapet, Markus
Hoeller, Christoph
Organization
National Research Council of Canada. Construction
Publisher
National Research Council of Canada. Construction
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Design and Systems
Keywords
Airborne Sound Transmission
Apparent Sound Transmission Class
Sound Transmission
Adhesive
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This Report presents the results from experimental studies of the airborne sound transmission of mass timber assemblies, together with an explanation of the calculation procedures to predict the apparent sound transmission class (ASTC) rating between adjacent spaces in a building constructed of mass timber assemblies. The experimental data which is the foundation for this Report includes the laboratory measured sound transmission loss of wall and floor assemblies constructed of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), Nail-Laminated Timber (NLT) and Dowel-Laminated Timber (DLT), and the laboratory measured vibration reduction index between assemblies of junctions between CLT assemblies. The presentation of the measured data is combined with the presentation of the appropriate calculation procedures to determine the ASTC rating in buildings comprised of such assemblies along with numerous worked examples. Several types of CLT constructions are commercially available in Canada, but this study focused on CLT assemblies with an adhesive applied between the faces of the timber elements in adjacent layers, but no adhesive bonding between the adjacent timber elements within a given layer. These CLT assemblies could be called “Face-Laminated CLT Assemblies” but are simply referred to as CLT assemblies in this Report. Another form of CLT assemblies does have adhesive applied between the faces of the timber elements in adjacent layers as well as adhesive to bond the adjacent timber elements within a given layer. These assemblies are referred to as “Fully-Bonded CLT Assemblies” in this Report. Because fully-bonded CLT assemblies have different properties than face-laminated CLT assemblies, the sound transmission data and predictions in this Report do not apply to fully-bonded CLT assemblies.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Acoustically-Tested Mass Timber Assemblies

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2639
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Floors
Walls

Acoustical Performance of Mass Timber Building Elements

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2553
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Sound Insulation
Acoustic Membrane
Acoustical Performance
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Jianhui Zhou at the University of Northern British Columbia
Summary
Building acoustics has been identified as one of the key subjects for the success of mass timber in the multi-storey building markets. The project will investigate the acoustical performance of mass timber panels produced in British Columbia. The apparent sound transmission class (ASTC) and impact insulation class (AIIC) of bare mass timber elements as wall and/ or floor elements will be measured through a lab mock-up. It is expected that a database of the sound insulation performance of British Columbia mass timber products will be developed with guidance on optimal acoustical treatments to achieve different levels of performance.
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Facilitation of Acoustics Testing for Sustainable Mass Timber Technologies, Leading to Publication of Open Source Acoustics Data for Standard Acoustics Scenarios

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2629
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Organization
University of Oregon
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Acoustics Testing Facility
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg at the University of Oregon
Summary
Our aim is to support the acceptance and increase market share of sustainable mass timber construction technologies such as Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), Mass Plywood Panel (MPP), Glue Laminated Timber (GLT), and Nail Laminated Timber (NLT), by lowering or eliminating barriers due to lack of acoustics data for mass timber construction assemblies. Currently, sustainable mass timber projects carry the cost of required acoustics testing, impairing their economic feasibility. With our new acoustics testing facility, testing supported by this grant will produce common acoustics data on the assemblies most in market demand. These data will be hosted in an online open-access database, supporting rapid growth in this industry. Increasingly specialized testing scenarios will be more easily accommodated, as this facility is located closer to USFS source materials and production facilities than currently operating facilities and is designed specifically for the specialized requirements of testing mass timber assemblies. Since sustainable mass timber technologies allow increased utilization of lower quality timber, and timber with insect damage, increasing the market share of mass timber will increase utilization of USFS timber, specifically that which might otherwise remain on-site unused. With removal of this type of timber, fire load will be lessened as well. Initial testing supported by this grant will include mass timber assemblies constructed with lower quality and smaller dimension timber.
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Vibration Serviceability Performance of Mass Timber Floors with Beam and Column Supports

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2818
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Organization
University of Northern British Columbia
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Frequency
Span Length
Vibration Performance
Mass Timber
Dynamic Behavior
Footfall Excitation
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Jianhui Zhou at the University of Northern British Columbia
Summary
Floor vibration performance could govern the allowable span of mass timber floors. The objectives of this project are: 1. to develop a mobile app to collect data from lab and field mass timber floors for acceleration-based performance criteria; 2. to investigate the dynamic properties of mass timber floors under different boundary conditions; 3. to adopt frequency equations to predict the fundamental frequencies of mass timber floors under different boundary conditions; 4. to develop numerical modeling strategies for predicting vibration response of mass timber floors under footfall excitations.
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Mass Timber Building Science Primer

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2797
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Fire
Acoustics and Vibration
General Information
Connections
Market and Adoption
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Kesik, Ted
Martin, Rosemary
Organization
Mass Timber Institute
RDH Building Science
Publisher
Mass Timber Institute
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Fire
Acoustics and Vibration
General Information
Connections
Market and Adoption
Serviceability
Keywords
Mass Timber
Building Science
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The development of this primer commenced shortly after the 2018 launch of the Mass Timber Institute (MTI) centered at the University of Toronto. Funding for this publication was generously provided by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. Although numerous jurisdictions have established design guides for tall mass timber buildings, architects and engineers often do not have access to the specialized building science knowledge required to deliver well performing mass timber buildings. MTI worked collaboratively with industry, design professionals, academia, researchers and code experts to develop the scope and content of this mass timber building science primer. Although provincially funded, the broader Canadian context underlying this publication was viewed as the most appropriate means of advancing Ontario’s nascent mass timber building industry. This publication also extends beyond Canada and is based on universally applicable principles of building science and how these principles may be used anywhere in all aspects of mass timber building technology. Specifically, these guidelines were developed to guide stakeholders in selecting and implementing appropriate building science practices and protocols to ensure the acceptable life cycle performance of mass timber buildings. It is essential that each representative stakeholder, developer/owner, architect/engineer, supplier, constructor, wood erector, building official, insurer, and facility manager, understand these principles and how to apply them during the design, procurement, construction and in-service phases before embarking on a mass timber building project. When mass timber building technology has enjoyed the same degree of penetration as steel and concrete, this primer will be long outdated and its constituent concepts will have been baked into the training and education of design professionals and all those who fabricate, construct, maintain and manage mass timber buildings. One of the most important reasons this publication was developed was to identify gaps in building science knowledge related to mass timber buildings and hopefully to address these gaps with appropriate research, development and demonstration programs. The mass timber building industry in Canada is still a collection of seedlings that continue to grow and as such they deserve the stewardship of the best available building science knowledge to sustain them until such time as they become a forest that can fend for itself.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Study of Massive Timber Walls based on NLT and Post Laminated LVL

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1585
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shear Walls
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Shear Tests
Glue Lines
Lateral Loading
Sheathing
Load Carrying Capacity
Stiffness
Energy Dissipation
Shear Strength
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Currently the massive timber shear walls are mainly made from Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), which possesses a high in-plane shear strength and rigidity. But only part of its elements (mainly the vertically aligned laminae) are engaged in carrying the vertical load and that could be a limitation when designing taller timber structures or wherever higher vertical load is present. This project studied alternative solutions to massive timber shear wall system, based on Nailed Laminated Timber (NLT) and post laminated LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber). The test was conducted on three levels: shear test on glue/nail line, bending-shear test on a small element, and full size wall test under lateral loading. The former two tests investigated the properties of basic elements in NLT and post laminated LVL. The results were used to design and predict the performance of full size shear walls. The NLT walls were tested under two conditions: without sheathing and with plywood sheathing. The wall without sheathing had the lowest load-carrying capacity and lowest stiffness. Adding plywood sheathing significantly increased its strength and stiffness. The failure in the wall with sheathing was at the sheathing connections, in the forms of nail withdrawal, nail head pull through, and nail breakage. The NLT wall with sheathing had a peak load up to 60% higher than the comparable light wood frame wall, also with a higher stiffness and better ductility. NLT shear walls have an internal energy dissipating capacity which CLT and post laminated LVL walls lack. The post laminated LVL walls behaved as a rigid plate under lateral loading, with little internal deformation. The failure occurred at the holdowns not within the wall. The size effect of its shear strength was studied and an equation was developed to calculate the shear strength of a large size wall plate. Both products have efficient vertical load bearing mechanism by arranging all elements in the vertical direction. They may serve as alternative to light wood frame walls or CLT walls. Some guidelines for the application and design of NLT shear walls and post laminated LVL shear walls were proposed.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.