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Calculation of Sound Insulation for Hybrid CLT Fabricated with Lumber and LVL and Comparison with Experimental Data

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2216
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Ju, Zehui
Zhang, Haiyang
Zhan, Tianyi
Hong, Lu
Lin, Yangfan
Lu, Xiaoning
Publisher
EDP Sciences
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
France
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Sound Insulation
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
MATEC Web of Conferences
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Modal Vibration Testing of an Innovative Timber Structure

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1494
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Leyder, Claude
Frangi, Andrea
Chatzi, Eleni
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Beech
Post-Tensioned
Modal Vibration Tests
Eigenfrequencies
Damping Ratios
Mode Shapes
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 177-185
Summary
This research paper deals with the evaluation of the dynamic modal vibration tests conducted on an innovative timber structure, the ETH House of Natural Resources. The building serves as a demonstrator of several innovative structural systems and technologies relating to timber. The main load-bearing structure comprises a posttensioned timber frame, which was subjected to modal vibration tests, firstly in the laboratory and, subsequently on the construction site. In this paper, the modal characteristics (eigenfrequencies, damping ratios and mode shapes), obtained from the laboratory testing campaign are presented. The modal vibration data is evaluated using polynomial and subspace identification techniques. The obtained results reveal that the structure exhibits pure translational, beam and column modes, as well as mixed beam-column modes. The bottom connection of the columns delivers significant influence on the modal characteristics, whereas the level of post-tensioning force yields no substantial influence in the modal characteristics obtained from low amplitude modal vibration tests.
Online Access
Free
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Model Calibration of Wooden Structure Assemblies - Using EMA and FEA

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue638
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bolmsvik, Åsa
Linderholt, Andreas
Olsson, Jörgen
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Experimental Modal Analysis
Finite Element Model
Sound Transmission
Vibrational Tests
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
To predict and, when needed to fulfil regularizations or other requirements, lower the impact sound transmission in light weight buildings prior to building, dynamically representative calculation models are needed. The material properties of commonly used building components have a documented spread in literature. Therefore, to validate the junction models, the dynamics of the actual assembly components have to be known. Here, the dynamic properties of a number of component candidates are measured using hammer excited vibrational tests. The spread of the properties of the components are hereby gained. Some of the components are selected to build up wooden assemblies which are evaluated first when they are screwed together and later when they are screwed and glued together. The focus is here on achieving representative finite element models of the junctions between the building parts composing the assemblies.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Acoustic Performance of Timber and Timber-Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue684
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Schluessel, Marc
Shrestha, Rijun
Crews, Keith
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
New Zealand
Australia
Building Code of Australia
Sound Insulation
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
A major problem in light-weight timber floors is their insufficient performance coping with impact noise in low frequencies. There are no prefabricated solutions available in Australia and New Zealand. To rectify this and enable the implementation of light-weight timber floors, a structural floor was designed and built in laminated veneer lumber (LVL). The floor was evaluated in a laboratory setting based on its behaviour and then modified with suspended ceilings and different floor toppings. Twenty-nine different floor compositions were tested. The bare floor could not reach the minimum requirement set by the Building Code of Australia (BCA) but with additional layers, a sufficient result of R'w+Ctr 53 dB and L’nT,w + CI 50 dB was reached. Doubling of the concrete mass added a marginal improvement. With concrete toppings and suspended ceiling it is possible to reach the goal in airborne and impact sound insulation. The best result was achieved by combining of additional mass and different construction layers.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Model Calibration of Wooden Strucuture Assemblies - Using EMA and FEA

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1001
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Bolmsvik, Åsa
Linderholt, Andreas
Olsson, Jörgen
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Experimental Modal Analysis
Impact Sound Transmission
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
To predict and, when needed to fulfil regularizations or other requirements, lower the impact sound transmission in light weight buildings prior to building, dynamically representative calculation models are needed. The material properties of commonly used building components have a documented spread in literature. Therefore, to validate the junction models, the dynamics of the actual assembly components have to be known. Here, the dynamic properties of a number of component candidates are measured using hammer excited vibrational tests. The spread of the properties of the components are hereby gained. Some of the components are selected to build up wooden assemblies which are evaluated first when they are screwed together and later when they are screwed and glued together. The focus is here on achieving representative finite element models of the junctions between the building parts composing the assemblies.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Acoustic Emission of Bolt-Bearing Testing on Structural Composite Lumbers

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1443
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Author
Du, Yicheng
Zhang, Jilei
Shi, Sheldon
Publisher
Society of Wood Science and Technology
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
OSL (Oriented Strand Lumber)
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Acoustic Emission
Bolted Connection
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science
Summary
Acoustic emission (AE) characteristics of full-hole bolt-bearing testing on structural compositelumbers (SCL) including laminated veneer lumber (LVL) and oriented strand lumber (OSL) were investigated. The main conclusion is that AE cumulative counts vs time curves of the tested SCL in this study can be characterized with three distinct regions in terms of AE count rates: Region I with a lower constant count rate, Region II with varied and increased count rates, and Region III with a higher constant count rate. Differences in AE count rates of these three regions occurred between LVL and OSL. Also, within each tested SCL, differences in AE count rates were observed among the three regions. These differences in terms of AE count rates between two tested SCL indicate that different types of wood-based composites might have different AE characteristics in terms of the count rate changes when they are subjected to increased bolt compression load. In other words, these differences in AE characteristics between the two tested materials suggest AE “signatures” do exist for SCL bolt connections.
Online Access
Free
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Dynamic Behaviour of LVL-Concrete Composite Flooring Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue315
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Abd. Ghafar, Nor
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Thesis
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Keywords
Finite Element Model
Dynamic Behaviour
Natural Frequency
Mode shape
Electrodynamic Shaker
Boundary Conditions
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This research focuses on the dynamic behaviour of long span LCC flooring systems. Experimental testing and finite element modelling was used to determine the dynamic behaviour, with particular regard to the natural frequency, fn and mode shape of an LCC floor. Both the experimental results and the finite element analyses agreed and showed that increased stiffness increased the natural frequency of the floor, and the boundary conditions influenced the dynamic behaviour of the LCC floor. Providing more restraint increased the stiffness of the floor system. The connectors' stiffness did not influence the dynamic performance of the floor. The research showed that a 8 m LCC long span floor can be constructed using LVL joists of between 300 mm to 400 mm depth with a concrete thickness of 65 mm for the longer spans, and joists of between 150 mm to 240 mm depth in conjunction with a concrete topping thickness of 100 mm for the shorter spans.
Online Access
Free
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Evaluation of Timber-Concrete Floor Performance under Occupant-Induced Vibrations using Continuous Monitoring

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue131
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Omenzetter, Piotr
Kohli, Varun
Desgeorges, Yohann
Publisher
Scientific.net
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Acoustics and Vibration
Serviceability
Keywords
Damping
Frequencies
Lightweight
Long Span
Office Buildings
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Key Engineering Materials
Summary
This paper describes the design of a system to monitor floor vibrations in an office building and an analysis of several months worth of collected data. Floors of modern office buildings are prone to occupant-induced vibrations. The contributing factors include long spans, slender and flexible designs, use of lightweight materials and low damping. As a result, resonant frequencies often fall in the range easily excited by normal footfall loading, creating potential serviceability problems due to undesirable levels of vibrations. This study investigates in-situ performance of a non-composite timber-concrete floor located in a recently constructed innovative multi-storey office building. The floor monitoring system consists of several displacement transducers to measure long-term deformations due to timber and concrete creep and three accelerometers to measure responses to walking forces, the latter being the focus of this paper. Floor response is typically complex and multimodal and the optimal accelerometer locations were decided with the help of the effective independence-driving point residue (EfI-DPR) technique. A novel approach to the EfI-DPR method proposed here uses a combinatorial search algorithm that increases the chances of obtaining the globally optimal solution. Several months worth of data collected by the monitoring system were analyzed using available industry guidelines, including ISO2631-1:1997(E), ISO10137:2007(E) and SCI Publication P354. This enabled the evaluation of the floor performance under real operating conditions.
Online Access
Free
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Ambient and Forced Vibration Testing and Finite Element Model Updating of a Full-Scale Posttensioned Laminated Veneer Lumber Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1103
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Worth, Margaret
Omenzetter, Piotr
Morris, Hugh
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Full Scale
In Situ
Finite Element Model
Dynamic Performance
Language
English
Conference
New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 13-15, 2012, Christchurch, New Zealand
Summary
The Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology Arts and Media building was completed in 2011 and consists of three seismically separate complexes. This research focussed on the Arts building as it showcases the use of coupled post-tensioned timber shear walls. These are part of the innovative Expan system. Full-scale, in-situ dynamic testing of the novel building was combined with finite element modelling and updating to obtain an understanding of the structural dynamic performance within the linear range. Ambient testing was performed at three stages during construction and was combined with forced vibration testing for the final stage. This forms part of a larger instrumentation program developed to investigate the wind and seismic response and long term deformations of the building. A finite element model of the building was formulated and updated using experimental modal characteristics. It was shown that the addition of non-structural elements, such as cladding and the staircase, increased the natural frequency of the first mode and the second mode by 19% and 24%, respectively. The addition of the concrete floor topping as a structural diaphragm significantly increased the natural frequency of the first mode but not the second mode, with an increase of 123% and 18%, respectively. The elastic damping of the NMIT building at low-level vibrations was identified as being between 1.6% and 2.4%
Online Access
Free
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Long-term Performance of Timber Concrete Composite Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2081
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Serviceability
Mechanical Properties
Acoustics and Vibration
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
Application
Floors

10 records – page 1 of 1.