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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Structural Response of Timber-Concrete Composite Beams Predicted by Finite Element Models And Manual Calculations

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue145
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Serviceability
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Author
Khorsandnia, Nima
Valipour, Hamid
Crews, Keith
Publisher
SAGE Journals
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Beams
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Connections
Eurocode
Finite Element Model
Loading
Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Advances in Structural Engineering
Summary
This paper presents the structural response of timber-concrete composite (TCC) beams predicted by finite element models (i.e. continuum-based and 1D frame) and manual calculations. Details of constitutive laws adopted for modelling timber and concrete are provided and application of the Hashin damage model in conjunction with continuum-based FE for capturing failure of timber under bi-axial stress state is discussed. A simplified strategy for modelling the TCC connection is proposed in which the connection is modelled by a nonlinear spring and the full load-slip behaviour of each TCC connection is expressed with a formula that can be directly implemented in the general purpose FE codes and used for nonlinear analysis of TCC beams. The developed FE models are verified by examples taken from the literature. Furthermore, the load-displacement response and ultimate loading capacity of the TCC beams are determined according to Eurocode 5 method and compared with FE model predictions.
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Timber-Concrete Composite: An Alternative Composite Floor System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2749
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Collins, Leah
Publisher
Kansas State University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Strength
Stiffness
Connections
Fasteners
Bending Stiffness
Stress
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The desire for sustainability has propelled innovation in structural engineering for much of the 21st century. Implement sustainable design without sacrificing the structural integrity of a building is important. The timber-concrete composite (TCC) floor system is an alternative floor system that offers superior sustainability and quick installation compared to other composite floors. TCC is comprised of a reinforced concrete slab connected to timber plate/beams by shear connectors that transfer the internal forces through the shear flow. To resist bending forces the reinforced concrete slab experiences the majority of compression stress and the timber plate/beam experience the majority of tension stress. Compared to an equivalent all-concrete section the TCC system has similar strength and stiffness as well as reduced weight.
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A Theoretical Approach Towards Ressource Efficiency in Multi-Story Timber Buildings Through BIM and Lean

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1910
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Columns

Value-Driven Design Approach for Optimal Long-Span Timber-Concrete Composite Floor in Multi-Storey Wooden Residential Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2738
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Movaffaghi, Hamid
Pyykkö, Johan
Yitmen, Ibrahim
Publisher
Taylor&Francis Online
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Long Span Floors
TCC
Design Challenges
Mid-Rise
Residential Buildings
Multi-Family
Multi-Storey
Long Span
Serviceability
Sustainability
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Civil Engineering and Environmental Systems
Summary
Long-span timber-concrete composite (TCC) floor systems have the potential to address the design challenges for conventional wooden floors in residential multi-storey timber frame buildings. The aim of this paper is to develop a design approach for long-span timber-concrete composite floor system of 6–9 m. A framework based on value-driven design approach has been developed for integration of results from graphical multi-objective optimisation, spreadsheet-based analysis, structural static and dynamic finite element analysis, and multi-criteria decision making. To verify the developed framework, a residential five-storey timber frame building as a case study has been studied. Optimal design includes optimised thickness of the concrete and optimised smeared stiffness of connectors for three different comfort classes A to C in descending order. TCC floor with span length 7.3 [m] belonging to comfort class A and TCC floor with span length 9.0 [m] belonging to comfort class C has been chosen as optimal solutions. The results indicate that proposed and innovative design approach is a promising tool for developers, architects and structural engineers when designing optimal long-span timber-concrete composite floor system.
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Modelling the Fire Performance of Structural Timber Floors

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue212
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
O'Neill, James
Abu, Anthony
Carradine, David
Moss, Peter
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Fire
Keywords
Failure Mechanisms
Finite Element Model
Fire Resistance
Thermo-mechanical
Full Scale
Language
English
Conference
International Conference on Structures in Fire
Research Status
Complete
Notes
June 6-8, 2012, Zurich, Switzerland
Summary
This paper describes numerical modelling to predict the fire resistance of engineered timber floor systems. The floor systems under investigation are timber composite floors (various timber joist and box floor cross sections), and timber-concrete composite floors. The paper describes 3D numerical modelling of the floor systems using finite element software, carried out as a sequential thermo-mechanical analysis. Experimental testing of these floor assemblies is also being undertaken to calibrate and validate the models, with a number of full scale tests to determine the failure mechanisms for each floor type and assess fire damage to the respective system components. The final outcome of this research will be simplified design methods for calculating the fire resistance of a wide range of engineered timber floor systems.
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Free
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Numerical Modelling of Timber Concrete Composite Structures in Fire - Guidance Document

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2166
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Beams

Multifunctional Composite Wall Elements for Multistory Buildings Made of Timber and Wood-Based Lightweight Concrete

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1520
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Walls
Author
Fadai, Alireza
Radlherr, Christoph
Setoodeh Jahromy, Sepehr
Winter, Wolfgang
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Walls
Topic
Environmental Impact
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Keywords
Lightweight Concrete
Energy Efficiency
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 613-622
Summary
This paper aims to discuss timber-wood lightweight concrete composites for application in wall components for buildings. The aim is to develop a multi-layer wall system composed of wood lightweight concrete, connected timber sections to gain and use advantages of each used material – lightweight, structural, thermal storage and insulation, ecological and economic benefits – to name the most important ones. The development of timber-wood lightweight concrete composites systems will lead to a new generation of polyvalent multi-material building components. By using renewable resources, waste products of the forest industry, and manufactured wood products, this technology provides statically and energy-efficient components for low-energy constructions. Such products support rapid-assembly construction methods, which use prefabricated dry elements to increase the efficiency of the construction. Wood-based alternatives to conventional concrete or masonry construction also open opportunities to reduce the carbon emissions.
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Experimental Analysis of Composite Timber-Concrete Wall Element

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue905
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Walls
Author
Hassan, Osama
Schedin, Staffan
Girhammar, Ulf
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Italy
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Nail Plate
shear connectors
Language
English
Conference
European Conference on Composite Materials
Research Status
Complete
Notes
June 24-28, 2012, Venice, Italy
Summary
The authors present an experimental and theoretical study on a composite or hybrid element used in residential and agricultural buildings. The composite wall element consists of timber studs connected to a concrete plate by means of nail plate shear connectors. Experimental results are presented and compared with an analytical model for partial composite action. A good agreement is obtained between the analytical and experimental results. Also, some suggestions to improve the design of the composite element are discussed.
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Free
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Harmonization of Structural and Functional Lifespans of Prefabricated Residential Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2744
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Serviceability
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Kokas, Balázs
Balogh, Jeno
Borsos, Ágnes
Gabriella, Medvegy
Bachmann, Bálint
Publisher
IIETA
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Design and Systems
Keywords
Prefabrication
Modular
Sustainability
Structural Lifespan
Functional Lifespan
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
International Journal of Design & Nature and Ecodynamics
Summary
Technological developments and social trends can create demand for new building functionalities, necessitating the adaptation of existing buildings. This paper presents the development of a modular building structural system that provides for the harmonization between the structural and functional lifespans of a building in order to achieve greater sustainability. The limitations of the existing prefabricated urban buildings with respect to their adaptability are contrasted with the proposed solution. The use of prefabricated engineered materials, such as cross laminated timber (CLT) and CLT-concrete composites, in conjunction with a modular system, reduces any climatic effects. The inherent advantages of incorporating detachable connections allows for the necessary structural adaptability, subsequently harmonizing and elongating the structural and functional lifespans. The resulting sustainable concept, when applied to residential buildings, could serve as a solution to address projections of future urban growth.
Online Access
Free
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The Fire Performance of Timber Floors in Multi-Storey Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue234
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
O'Neill, James
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Thesis
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Fire
Design and Systems
Keywords
Abaqus
Finite Element Model
Full Scale
Furnace Tests
Charring Rate
Dead Load
Live Load
Zero-Strength Layer
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This research investigated the fire performance of unprotected timber floors, focussing on composite joist floors, composite box floors and timber-concrete composite floors. The study of these floors was conducted using the finite element software ABAQUS using a thermo-stress analysis in three dimensions, and with experimental fire tests of floor assemblies. The major goal of this research was to develop a simplified design approach for timber floors, validated against the numerical and experimental work. Four furnace tests were conducted on unprotected timber floor systems in the full-scale furnace at the BRANZ facilities in New Zealand. A sequentially coupled thermal-stress analysis was conducted to determine the effects of a fire on floor assemblies under load. The thermal modelling predicted the charring damage of the floors tested in the experiments to within a few millimetres of precision, and the simplified assumptions made in relation to fire inputs, boundary conditions, mesh refinement and effective material parameters were accurate to the desired level of precision. A sensitivity study was conducted comparing different mesh sizes, time step sizes, material model approaches and software suites to determine any shortfalls which may be encountered in the analysis. It was found that a material model adopting a latent heat approach was the most adequate for modelling timber in fires using these effective values, and mesh sizes of up to 6 mm produced relatively precise results. The structural modelling predicted the displacement response and failure times of the floors to within 20% of the experimental data, and the simplified assumptions made in relation to fire inputs, boundary conditions, mesh refinement and effective material properties were once again accurate to the desired level of precision. A modification to the reduction in tension strength at elevated temperatures was proposed to better predict the observed behaviour. A sensitivity study concluded that the material model definition plays a vital role in the output of the modelling. Non-standard fire exposures were also modelled for completeness. A simplified design method to estimate the fire resistance of unprotected floor assemblies was also developed. The method uses a bi-linear charring rate the assumption of a zero strength layer in the timber. The method was compared to the experimental data from this research and others around the world. The results were also compared to other charring rate methodologies from around the world.
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Free
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10 records – page 1 of 1.