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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Design, Fabrication and Operation Proposals for Glued-Laminated Timber, Based on Measuring and Modelling Results, Chapter 1: Literature Review and the Results of Examinations of the Spoil of the Glue Laminated Timber Beams

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1133
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Author
Vanya, Csilla
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Hungary
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Topic
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Keywords
Delamination
Damage
Language
Hungarian
Research Status
Complete
Series
Faipar
ISSN
2064-9231
Summary
Glue laminated timber beams have been used in an increasing number of cases in the past 50 years. Glue laminated beams are durable constructs if they are manufactured from adequate quality materials and if their installation and operation are performed to a high quality standard. There are however an increasing number of cases of glue laminated beams suffering damage and as a result entire roof structures becoming life-threatening. Because of the arising problems the most important building complexes in Hungary-in which glue laminated beams are used as bearing structures- have been examined, considering both the demage problems of the existing structures and the operating features of the buildings. Later the reasons for the demages were examined with measurements and caculations. From all these observations conclusions and suggestions have been outlined both for the design, construction and operation.
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Free
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High Energy Performance Six-Storey Wood-Frame Building: Field Monitoring

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1918
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Energy Performance
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Roofs
Rooms
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Roofs
Rooms
Topic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Durability
Vertical Movement
Indoor Environmental Conditions
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This monitoring study aims to generate field performance data from a highly energy efficient building in the west coast climate as part of FPInnovations’ efforts to assist the building sector in developing durable and energy efficient wood-based buildings. A six-storey mixed-use building, with five storeys of wood-frame residential construction on top of concrete commercial space was completed in early 2018 in the City of Vancouver. It was designed to meet the Passive House standard. The instrumentation aimed to gather field data related to the indoor environment, building envelope moisture performance, and vertical movement to address the most critical concerns among practitioners for such buildings.
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Free
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Long-span Timber Roof Structure for the New Feyenoord Stadium

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2575
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Roofs

Failures in Large-Span Roof Structures in Switzerland

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue296
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Author
Steiger, René
Herwig, Andrin
Widmann, Robert
Piskoty, Gabor
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Large Span
Failure
Switzerland
Language
English
Conference
International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering Symposium
Research Status
Complete
Notes
May 6-8, 2013, Rotterdam, Netherlands
Summary
The present paper describes collapses and failures of three large-span roof structures in Switzerland: In February 2009 the steel roof of a three years old gym in eastern Switzerland collapsed. Based on visual findings and on a detailed investigation it could be found that the cause of the collapse was a deficient detailing in each of the seven 26 m long, simply supported main steel plate girders. The collapse was triggered by increasing snow load although at the day of collapse the load was 25% lower than the characteristic value according to the Swiss design code. In November 2003 the roof of a timber multi-purpose hall partly collapsed after a period of rain. The investigations showed that the most relevant reason for the collapse was the incorrect execution of welds at the joints of supporting shoes in conjunction with the marginal design of that detail. From other factors that contributed to the collapse an insufficient drainage system of the roof could be identified as having played an important role. In 2011 a 180 x 1120 mm2 glued-laminated timber beam with a span of 18 m being part of the secondary structural system supporting the flat roof of a DIY superstore near Zurich failed in bending. The failure had been triggered to a considerable extent due to overloading of parts of the roof by a gravel layer compared to other parts of the roof being of higher depth and specific weight. From all three incidents it could be concluded that a closer orientation of the design to available design codes and a strict quality control during design, execution and use of the building would have reduced the probability of collapse / failure of the roof structures considerably.
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Environmental Thermal Comfort of a Reduced Model Using Cross-Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2695
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Energy Performance
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Author
Sampaio, Carlos
Terezo, Rodrigo
Motta, Guilherme
Silva, Leonardo
Júnior, Ilson Vassem
Publisher
SciELO
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Topic
Energy Performance
Keywords
Precasting in Wood
Self-Supporting
Thermal Comfort
Environmental Factors
Brazil
Thermal Performance
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Engenharia Agrícola
Summary
The challenges for the use of the cross-laminated timber (CLT) system in the Brazilian agricultural market are significant. This study evaluated the thermal performance of fiber cement tiles associated with a CLT non-conventional structure compared to those of ceramic, fiber cement and aluminum roof tiles based on following thermal comfort indexes (i.e., black globe humidity index (BGHI), radiant heat load (RHL) and specific enthalpy) using physical conventional models of reduced-scale rural facilities under summer conditions. The non-conventional CLT model comprised closing walls and a lining that form a self-supporting structure with few air inlets. This model presented reduced thermal comfort indexes compared to the other conventional roofs. Moreover, the CLT model has an average black globe temperature (Tbg) of 32.9 °C, which was lower at all times compared to those of the other roofs. In conclusion, the roof with fiber cement tiles associated with the CLT structure exhibited the best performance in terms of thermal comfort, followed by the ceramic, fiber cement, and aluminum tiles. The study results allow a better understanding of the opportunities for CLT usage.
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Free
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Evaluation of Bending Performance of Nail Laminated and Dowel Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2309
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Roofs
Bridges and Spans
Wood Building Systems

Reassessment of the Integrity of a Partially Failed Glulam Structure

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue128
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs

Illustrated Guide R30+ Effective Vaulted & Flat Roofs

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2348
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Roofs
Author
Marleau, Christopher
Higgins, James
Ricketts, Lorne
Roppel, Patrick
Publisher
BC Housing Research Centre
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Book/Guide
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Roofs
Topic
Moisture
Energy Performance
Design and Systems
Keywords
Vaulted Roofs
Water-Shedding Roofs
Flat Waterproof Membrane Roofs
Thermal Performance
Moisture Management
Air Leakage
Durability
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This Illustrated Guide consolidates information on vaulted water-shedding roofs and flat waterproof membrane roofs that are capable of meeting R-30 or greater effective thermal performance when used on low- and mid-rise wood-frame buildings. The guide is intended to be an industry, utility, and government resource with respect to meeting this thermal performance level, while not compromising other aspects of building enclosure performance, including moisture management, air leakage, and durability.
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Free
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Durability and Protection of CLT in Parking Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2267
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Roofs
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Mass Timber
Stress Tests
Weathering
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Contact:Lech Muszynski, Oregon State University
Summary
The City of Springfield, Oregon hired SRG Partnership to design a CLT parking structure slated to be built in a new redevelopment zone on the Willamette River. The concept started as an academic exercise in a University of Oregon architectural design studio course led by Professor Judith Sheine. Mayor Christine Lundberg saw an opportunity to connect Springfield’s historic roots in the timber industry to the burgeoning new mass timber sector, and the project became a reality. Before the structure is built, important technical questions must be addressed concerning how to protect the timber elements against the Pacific Northwest weather and long-term dynamic loading from vehicles. A technical team from OSU’s Department of Wood Science and Engineering and School of Civil and Construction Engineering are narrowing down combinations of materials for testing. Proposed solutions include an asphalt topping on the CLT decking, similar to those often used on timber bridge decks. Stress tests will be conducted, simulating forces from vehicles turning, starting and stopping and backing up. Simulated weather testing will also be conducted in OSU’s multi-chamber modular environmental conditioning chamber. The Energy Studies in Buildings Laboratory at University of Oregon has conducted wind-driven rain studies to inform SRG’s design of the roof and exterior screening elements.
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Connection and Performance of Two-Way CLT Plates

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1482
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Roofs
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Keywords
Two-Way
Bending Test
Modulus of Elasticity
Self-Tapping Screws
Glued-In-Rod
Steel Connectors
Steel Plates
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The two-way action of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) is often ignored in the design of CLT due to its complexity. But in some cases, for example, large span timber floor/roof, the benefit of taking the two-way action into account may be considerable since it is often deflection controlled in the design. Furthermore CLT panels are typically limited to widths of less than 3 m. therefore, for practical applications, engaging CLT panels in two-way action as a plate in bending would require connecting two panels in the width/minor direction to take out-of-plane loading. To address this technically difficult situation, an innovative connection was developed to join the CLT panels in the minor direction to form a large continuous two-way plate. The two-way action of CLT was also quantified. Static bending test was conducted on CLT panels in the major and minor directions to measure the Modulus of Elasticity (MOE). This provided a benchmark for the following connection test, and data for the future development of computer modeling. The average apparent MOE was 9.09 GPa in the major direction and 2.37 GPa in the minor direction. Several connection techniques were considered and tested, including self-tapping wood screws, glued in steel rods, and steel connectors. One connecting system was found to be effective. For the panel configuration considered, the system was consisted of steel plates, self-tapping wood screws, and 45° screw washers. Two steel plates were placed on the tension side with sixteen screws, and one steel plates was placed on the compression side with four screws. When the screws were driven into the wood, the screws were tightly locked with the washers and steel plates, and at the same time, the wood members were pulled together by the screws. This eliminated any original gap within the connection. The connector was installed to join two CLT members in the minor direction. They were tested under bending with the same setup as above. The connected panels had an average apparent MOE of 2.37 GPa, and an average shear-free MOE of 2.44 GPa, both of which were higher than the counterpart in the full panels. The moment capacity of the connected panels was also high. The minimum moment capacity was 3.2 times the design value. Two large CLT panels were tested under concentrated loading with four corners simply supported. The deflection of nine locations within the panels was measured. This data will be used to validate the computer modeling for CLT two-way action.
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10 records – page 1 of 1.