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Development of Modular System in Midrise to Tall Wood Buildings Phase II

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2530
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Zhang, Chao
Organization
Timber Engineering and Applied Mechanics (TEAM) Laboratory
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Openings
Lateral Performance
Shear Walls
SPF
Spruce-Pine-Fir
Loading Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This project studied the effect of openings on the lateral performance of CLT shear walls and the system behavior of the walls in a module. Three-layer Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) was used for manufacturing the wall and module specimens. The laminar was Spruce-Pine-Fir (SPF) #2&Better for both the major and minor layers. Each layer was 35 mm thick. The panel size was 2.44 m × 2.44 m. Four configurations of walls were investigated: no opening, 25% opening, 37.5% opening, and 50% opening. The opening was at the center of the wall and in the shape of a square. A CLT module was made from two walls with 50% openings, with an overall thickness of 660 mm. The specimens were tested under monotonic loading and reverse-cyclic loading, in accordance with ASTM E564-06 (2018) and ASTM E2126-19. The wall without opening had an average peak load of 111.8 kN. It had little internal deformation and the failure occurred at the connections. With a 25% opening, deformation within the wall was observed but the failure remained at the connections. It had the same peak load as the full wall. When the opening was increased to 37.5%, the peak load decreased by 6% to 104.9 kN and the specimens failed in wood at the corners of the opening. Further increasing the opening to 50%, the peak load dropped drastically to 63.4 kN, only 57% of the full wall. The load-displacement relationship was approximately linear until the load reached 60% of the peak or more. Compared to the full wall, the wall with 25% opening had 65% of the stiffness. When the opening increased to 37.5% and 50%, the stiffness reduced to 50% and 24% of the full wall, respectively. The relationship between stiffness and opening ratio was approximately linear. The loading protocol had effect on the peak load but not on the stiffness. There was more degradation for larger openings under reverse-cyclic loading. The performance of the module indicated the presence of system effect that improves the ductility of the wall, which is important for the seismic performance of the proposed midrise to tall wood buildings. The test data was compared to previous models found in literature. Simplified analytical models were also developed to estimate the lateral stiffness and strength of CLT wall with openings.
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Heavy Laminated Timber Frames with Rigid Three-Dimensional Beam-To-Column Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue499
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Beams
Author
Kasal, Bohumil
Guindos, Pablo
Polocoser, Tiberiu
Heiduschke, Andreas
Urushadze, Shota
Pospisil, Stanislav
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Beams
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Full Scale
Self-Tapping Screws
Cyclic Loads
Beam-to-Column
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Performance of Constructed Facilities
Summary
This article presents the seismic performance of a timber frame with three-dimensional (3D) rigid connections. The connections were made with self-tapping screws and hardwood blocks were used to support the beams. The frame was designed to resist high seismic excitations with the goal of controlling the drift. The moment-rotation characteristics of the connections were measured in the laboratory by applying static cyclic loads. The frame made of laminated wood beams and columns, and cross-laminated lumber deck, was subjected to seismic, white noise, snapback, and sinusoidal sweep excitations. The synthetic seismic excitation was designed to contain a considerable amount of energy close to the frame’s first natural frequency. The structure showed no significant damage up to a peak ground acceleration of 1.25g. Failure of the frame occurred due to shearing of the columns with a peak ground acceleration of 1.5g. The designed structure fulfilled with current serviceability limits up to 0.8g.
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Durable Solutions for Balconies and Decks in Midrise Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2536
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Balconies
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Home Innovation Research Labs
Country of Publication
United States
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Balconies
Topic
Design and Systems
Moisture
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contacts are John B. Peavey at Home Innovation Research Labs and Xiping Wang at the Forest Products Laboratory
Summary
The proposed study will evaluate the moisture performance of balconies and decks in midrise multifamily and mixed-use wood-frame buildings with various types of exterior cladding materials. The study will culminate in recommended best practices for balcony and deck construction in midrise wood-frame buildings, with the focus on water management and integration with the primary building enclosure systems. A broad range of finishes and balcony configurations will be evaluated for applications across various construction markets and climatic conditions. The outcome will include a set of specific details and solutions for durable wood-frame deck and balconies with focus on the interface with the exterior wall systems.
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Seismic Assessment of a Heavy-Timber Frame Structure with Ring-Doweled Moment-Resisting Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1383
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Rodrigues, Leonardo
Branco, Jorge
Neves, Luís
Barbosa, André
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Journal Article
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Ring-Doweled Connections
Seismic Performance
Eurocode 5
Eurocode 8
Ductility
Probabilistic Approach
Q Factor
Fragility Curves
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Bulletin of Earthquake Engineering
ISSN
1573-1456
Summary
The performance of heavy-timber structures in earthquakes depends strongly on the inelastic behavior of the mechanical connections. Nevertheless, the nonlinear behavior of timber structures is only considered in the design phase indirectly through the use of an R-factor or a q-factor, which reduces the seismic elastic response spectrum. To improve the estimation of this, the seismic performance of a three-story building designed with ring-doweled moment resisting connections is analyzed here. Connections and members were designed to fulfill the seismic detailing requirements present in Eurocode 5 and Eurocode 8 for high ductility class structures. The performance of the structure is evaluated through a probabilistic approach, which accounts for uncertainties in mechanical properties of members and connections. Nonlinear static analyses and multi-record incremental dynamic analyses were performed to characterize the q-factor and develop fragility curves for different damage levels. The results indicate that the detailing requirements of Eurocode 5 and Eurocode 8 are sufficient to achieve the required performance, even though they also indicate that these requirements may be optimized to achieve more cost-effective connections and members. From the obtained fragility curves, it was verified that neglecting modeling uncertainties may lead to overestimation of the collapse capacity.
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The Heavy Timber Buckling-Restrained Braced Frame as a Solution for Commercial Buildings in Regions of High Seismicity

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1651
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Blomgren, Hans-Erik
Koppitz, Jan-Peter
Díaz Valdés, Abel
Ko, Eric
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Solid-sawn Heavy Timber
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Lateral Load Resisting System
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
US
Building Codes
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3515-3524
Summary
Timber building construction has been traditionally utilized to reduce inertial demands in high seismic regions. Applications in the United States however, are often limited to low-rise buildings of light-wood construction with distributed load bearing shear walls. Recent advancements in timber technologies are pushing mass timber systems into larger commercial scale markets where steel and concrete systems dominate the landscape. In high seismic regions, mass timber buildings currently lack code-defined lateral force resisting systems. This paper presents a new lateral force resisting system concept, known as the Heavy Timber Buckling-Restrained Braced Frame. The system is conceived, although not limited, for application in mid and high-rise building timber construction, and is inspired by the unbonded steel brace technology today widely spread throughout Japan and the United States. In order to qualify the system for future implementation in building codes, the paper presents results from proof-of-concept component testing of a brace consisting of a steel core and a mechanically laminated glulam casing acting as the bucklingrestraint mechanism. As well, findings from a study for implementation at the building system level is provided in order to assess overall system performance, constructability, and detailing.
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Dynamic Testing and Numerical Modeling of Residential Building Modules

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue105
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Cross-Laminated Timber Fasteners Solutions for Tall Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2197
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Shear Walls
Walls
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Shear Walls
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Wall-to-Floor
Wall-to-Wall
Wall-to-Foundation
Strength Properties
Screw Connectors
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Arijit Sinha at Oregon State University
Summary
Constructing buildings with CLT requires development of novel panel attachment methods and mechanisms. Architects and engineers need to know the engineering strength properties of connected panels, especially in an earthquake prone area. This project will improve knowledge of three types of wall panel connections: wall-to-floor, wall-to-wall, and wall-to-foundation. Testing will determine the strength properties of metal connectors applied with diffferent types and sizes of screw fasteners. The data will be used to develop a modeling tool that engineers can use when designing multi-story buildings to be constructed with CLT panels.
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Design of Controlled Rocking Heavy Timber Walls For Low-To-Moderate Seismic Hazard Regions

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2370
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Kovacs, Michael
Publisher
McMaster University
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Controlled Rocking
Heavy Timber
Low-to-Moderate Seismic Hazard
Post-Tensioned Timber
Force-Based Design
Non-Linear Time-History Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The controlled rocking heavy timber wall (CRHTW) is a high-performance structural solution that was first developed in New Zealand, mainly considering Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL), to resist high seismic loads without sustaining structural damage. The wall responds in bending and shear to small lateral loads, and it rocks on its foundation in response to large seismic loads. In previous studies, rocking has been controlled by both energy dissipation elements and post-tensioning, and the latter returns the wall to its original position after a seismic event. The controlled rocking response avoids the need for structural repair after an earthquake, allowing for more rapid return to occupancy than in conventional structures. Whereas controlled rocking walls with supplemental energy dissipation have been studied before using LVL, this thesis proposes an adapted CRHTW in which the design and construction cost and complexity are reduced for low-to-moderate seismic hazard regions by removing supplemental energy dissipation and using cross-laminated timber (CLT) because of its positive economic and environmental potential in the North American market. Moreover, whereas previous research has focussed on direct displacement-based design procedures for CRHTWs, with limited consideration of force-based design parameters, this thesis focusses on force-based design procedures that are more common in practice. A design and analysis process is outlined for the adapted CRHTW, based on a similar methodology for controlled rocking steel braced frames. The design process includes a new proposal to minimize the design forces while still controlling peak drifts, and it also includes a new proposal for predicting the influence of the higher modes by referring to previous research on the capacity design of controlled rocking steel braced frames. Also, a numerical model is outlined, including both a baseline version and a lower-bound model based on comparison to experimental data. The numerical model is used for non-linear time-history analysis of a prototype design, confirming the expected performance of the adapted CRHTW, and the model is also used for incremental dynamic analyses of three-, six-, and nine-storey prototypes, which show a low probability of collapse.
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Proposal for a Standardized Design and Modeling Procedure of Tall CLT Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1219
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Polastri, Andrea
Pozza, Luca
Publisher
University of Kragujevac
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Montenegro
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Stiffness
Numerical Modeling
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
International Journal for Quality Research
ISSN
1800-7473
Summary
A crucial issue in the design of a mid-rise Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) building under horizontal seismic action, is the definition of the principal elastic vibration period of an entire superstructure. Such vibration period depends on the mass distribution and on the global stiffness of the buildings. In a CLT structure the global stiffness of the buildings is highly sensitive to deformability of the connection elements. Consequently for a precise control of the vibration period of the building it is crucial to define the stiffness of each connections used to assemble a superstructure. A design procedure suitable for a reliable definition of the connection stiffness is proposed referring to code provisions and experimental tests. Discussion addresses primary issues associated with the usage of proposed procedure for numerical modeling of case study tall CLT buildings is reported.
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Free
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Tall Cross-Laminated Timber Building: Design and Performance Session WW300 Experimental and Modeling Studies on Wood Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue618
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dolan, Daniel
Bordry, Vincent
Pei, Shiling
van de Lindt, John
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Damping
Multi-Story
Ductility
Cost
Fire Resistance
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2014
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 3-5, 2014, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is widely perceived as the most promising option for building high-rise wood structures due to its structural robustness and good fire resistance. While gravity load design of a tall CLT building is relatively easy to address because all CLT walls can be utilized as bearing walls, design for significant lateral loads (earthquake and wind) can be challenging due to the lack of ductility in current CLT construction methods that utilize wall panels with low aspect ratios (height to length). Keeping the wall panels at high aspect ratios can provide a more ductile response, but it will inevitably increase the material and labor costs associated with the structure. In this study, a solution to this dilemma is proposed by introducing damping and elastic restoring devices in a multi-story CLT building to achieve ductile response, while keeping the integrity of low aspect ratio walls to reduce the cost of construction and improve fire resistance. The design methodology for incorporating the response modification devices is proposed and the performance of the as-designed structure under seismic is evaluated.
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10 records – page 1 of 1.