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Hardwood CLT Program in Southern and Central Ontario

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2762
Year of Publication
2021
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Li, Xincheng
Publisher
University of Toronto
Year of Publication
2021
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Keywords
Manufacturing
Hardwood
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a large prefabricated solid engineering plank made of multiple layers of planks glued together and it is primarily used in structures such as the floors, walls, and roofs of buildings. ANSI/APA PRG 320 is the world recognized CLT lumber production standard, and the main raw material of CLT has always been softwood rather than hardwood. However, the bending strength, compressive strength, and shear strength of hardwood CLT lumber are stronger than softwood CLT lumber. The large and underutilized hardwood resources in central and southern Ontario provide a huge resource advantage for the hardwood CLT project. This article uses the Cost-Benefit Assessments model to assess the feasibility of investing in hardwood CLT plants in central and southern Ontario. The results show that the payback period of the hardwood CLT factory is 5 years, and the rate of return on investment of 10 years, 15 years, and 20 years are all-around 11%. This study could strengthen investor confidence and it also identifies the direction for the development of hardwood CLT plants in central and southern Ontario.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Carbon Value Engineering: Integrated Carbon and Cost Reduction Strategies for Building Design

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2268
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Environmental Impact
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Beams
Author
Robati, Mehdi
Oldfield, Philip F.
Nezhad, Ali Akbar
Carmichael, David
Organization
UNSW Sydney
Multiplex Australasia
Publisher
Cooperative Research for Low Carbon Living
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Australia
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Beams
Topic
Environmental Impact
Cost
Keywords
Value Engineering
Embodied Carbon
Hybrid Life Cycle Assessment
Capital Cost
Environmentally-extended Input-Output Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The research presents a Carbon Value Engineering framework. This is a quantitative value analysis method, which not only estimates cost but also considers the carbon impact of alternative design solutions. It is primarily concerned with reducing cost and carbon impacts of developed design projects; that is, projects where the design is already a completed to a stage where a Bill of Quantity (BoQ) is available, material quantities are known, and technical understanding of the building is developed. This research demonstrates that adopting this integrated carbon and cost method was able to reduce embodied carbon emissions by 63-267 kgCO2-e/m2 (8-36%) when maintaining a concrete frame, and 72-427 kgCO2-e/m2 (10-57%) when switching to a more novel whole timber frame. With a GFA of 43,229 m2 these savings equate to an overall reduction of embodied carbon in the order of 2,723 – 18,459 tonnes of CO2-e. Costs savings for both alternatives were in the order of $127/m2 which equates to a 10% reduction in capital cost. For comparison purposes the case study was also tested with a high-performance façade. This reduced lifecycle carbon emissions in the order of 255 kgCO2-e/m2, over 50 years, but at an additional capital cost, due to the extra materials. What this means is strategies to reduce embodied carbon even late in the design stage can provide carbon savings comparable, and even greater than, more traditional strategies to reduce operational emissions over a building’s effective life.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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A Theoretical Approach Towards Ressource Efficiency in Multi-Story Timber Buildings Through BIM and Lean

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1910
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Columns

Comparison of Different Assembling Techniques Regarding Cost, Durability, and Ecology: A Survey of Multi-Layer Wooden Panel Assembly Load-Bearing Construction Elements

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue62
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Buck, Dietrich
Wang, Alice
Hagman, Olle
Gustafsson, Anders
Publisher
North Carolina State University
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Keywords
Durability
Assembling Techniques
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
BioResources
Summary
Wood is a pure, sustainable, renewable material. The increasing use of wood for construction can improve its sustainability. There are various techniques to assemble multi-layer wooden panels into prefabricated, load-bearing construction elements. However, comparative market and economy studies are still scarce. In this study, the following assembling techniques were compared: laminating, nailing, stapling, screwing, stress laminating, doweling, dovetailing, and wood welding. The production costs, durability, and ecological considerations were presented. This study was based on reviews of published works and information gathered from 27 leading wood product manufacturing companies in six European countries. The study shows that the various techniques of assembling multi-layer wooden construction panel elements are very different. Cross laminated timber (CLT) exhibited the best results in terms of cost and durability. With regard to ecological concerns, dovetailing is the best. Taking into account both durability and ecological considerations, wooden screw-doweling is the best. These alternatives give manufacturers some freedom of choice regarding the visibility of surfaces and the efficient use of lower-quality timber. CLT is the most cost-effective, is not patented, and is a well-established option on the market today.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Feasibility of Cross Laminated Timber Panels in Construction: A Case Study of Carbon12

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2594
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Graber, Erik
Publisher
California Polytechnic State University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Case Study
Cost comparison
Concrete Slab
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) is an extremely strong engineered wood panel intended for roof, floor, or wall applications. Currently there is little research comparing CLT to steel and concrete, materials CLT hopes to replace This research uses a detailed literary analysis on CLT and case study on Carbon12, a recently constructed CLT structure in Portland, Oregon, to compare the cost and schedule requirements of CLT with a cast-in-place concrete slab. The case study consisted of a detailed analysis of Carbon12, interview with Scott Noble, senior project manager for Carbon12, and a detailed schedule and cost analysis. Results showed that for a concrete floor system used on Carbon12, material costs were far less than costs for a CLT floor system and labor costs were far greater than costs for a CLT floor system. For the schedule analysis, results showed that a concrete floor system would add an additional 10 weeks to the construction schedule of Carbon12. These results led to the conclusion that CLT is a feasible building material for dense, urban, mid-rise structures similar to Carbon12. The quick installation time, small crew, and environmental benefits of CLT outweigh the added costs of the material.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Use of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) in Industrial Buildings in Nordic Climate — A Case Study

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2352
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Cost
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Construction Management for Tall CLT Buildings: From Partial to Total Prefabrication of Façade Elements

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue224
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Gasparri, Eugenia
Lucchini, Angelo
Mantegazza, Gabriele
Mazzucchelli, Enrico
Publisher
Taylor&Francis Online
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Keywords
High-Rise
Prefabrication
Tall Wood
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood Material Science & Engineering
Notes
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17480272.2015.1075589
Summary
Cross-Laminated Timber is one of the most widely used engineered wood products, thanks to its numerous advantages, among which construction speed is the most appreciated, both by clients and by designers. However, construction scheduling compression refers exclusively to CLT structures, while the rest of the construction process still requires a longer phase to complete vertical enclosures. The aim of the research work presented in this paper is to outline advantages brought about when the degree of envelope prefabrication of tall timber buildings is increased. Results are presented in two sections. The first includes the definition of a case study together with an overview of possible technical details for entirely prefabricated façade solutions, ready to be installed without the need to work via scaffolds. The second deals with construction site management analysis for the case study building, where the determination of specific factors having an influence on time and costs is achieved by varying the prefabrication degree of the various façade configurations and repeating the analysis process. The main findings of this research work demonstrate that comprehensive façade prefabrication allows not only consistent compression of construction scheduling to be achieved, but also for immediate protection of wooden elements from weather agents.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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New Attributes and Economic Analyses of Composite CLT and Value-Added Appearance-Based CLT

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue354
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Cost
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Grandmont, Jean-Frédéric
Wang, Brad
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Cost
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Delamination
Hardwood
Softwood
Structural Composite Lumber
Economic Analysis
Structural Properties
Aesthetic Properties
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of this study was to examine new attributes and conduct economic analyses for composite CLT (CCLT) and value-added appearance-based CLT products manufactured with varying substitution of softwood lumber with structural composite lumber (SCL) and hardwood lumber. Incentives for including such materials could be aesthetic, structural and economic. Structural and aesthetic property assessments were carried out on prototype CLT panels. Multiple CLT panel configurations (17) were evaluated to assess the effects of including hardwood and SCL materials in the layups. Presence of hardwood in the panels’ configuration generally led to higher checking and density. Because of the higher shrinkage of hardwood, the bondline suffered from more delamination. A lower density hardwood (aspen) was included in some configurations and exhibited a greater direct compatibility with current Canadian manufacturing process. Changes to this process, such as selecting a hardwood specific adhesive may lead to improvements.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Development of Light Prefabricated Hybrid Structures for a High-Rise Multi-Storey Building with Emphasis on Connections

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2248
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Organization
Université Laval
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Keywords
Vibration
Fire Resistance
Seismic
Ductile
Connections
Ultra-High Performance Concrete
Prefabrication
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Luca Sorelli at Université Laval
Summary
Hybrid wood-concrete structures are emerging in the multi-storey wood building market, as they provide effective solutions in terms of lightness, rigidity, vibration and fire resistance (Yeoh et al., 2010, Dagenais et al., 2016). This project aims to reduce the cost of these hybrid floors by reducing the time of construction by prefabrication technology with emphasis on use. In addition, the goal is to explore the use of Ultra High Performance Fiber Composite Concrete (UHPC) to reduce the thickness of the wood slab, and also the use of ductile connections to increase the reliability of the floor (Habel and Gauvreau). 2008, Zhang and Gauvreau 2014, Auclair-Cuerrier et al 2016a). Finally, the concrete slab improves the diaphragm behavior of the floor to seismic actions.
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Mass Timber Economics of 7-12 Storey Residential Rental Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2813
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Morrison Hershield
BC Housing
Country of Publication
Canada
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Keywords
Cost Effective
Cost-Competitive
ROI
Building Code
Affordable Housing
Mass Timber
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Eric Wood at Morrison Hershfield
Summary
The study assesses the potential of mass timber multi-unit residential construction as it compares to traditional methods including concrete and steel in terms of cost competitiveness, cost effectiveness, financial value and ROI. The analysis will include potential limitations of existing building codes, how the codes support or constrain the use of mass timber, including impacts to affordability, and whether further industry and government support of tall wood construction is needed to integrate it into Canada’s housing supply. To inform the analysis, the study produces base case archetypes for concrete and steel structures, and then create a series of comparative archetypes mass timber structures and hybrid structures in the range of 7-12 storeys.
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10 records – page 1 of 1.