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Lateral Behaviour and Direct Displacement Based Design of a Novel Hybrid Structure: Cross Laminated Timber Infilled Steel Moment Resisting Frames

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue175
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Bezabeh, Matiyas
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Displacement
Frames
Lateral Loads
Model
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recently, an innovative hybrid structure has been developed as an alternative lateral-load resisting system at The University of British Columbia. The hybrid structure incorporates Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) shear panels as an infill in steel moment resisting frames (SMRFs). In order to increase the applicability of the proposed system, in this thesis, a direct displacement based design methodology has been developed and analytically validated. Initially, a nonlinear time history analysis (NLTHA) was carried out to study the lateral behaviour of the proposed hybrid structure. For this purpose, a total of 162 different hybrid buildings were modeled and analyzed in OpenSees by using twenty earthquake ground motions (2% probability exceedance in 50 years). Post-earthquake performance indicators (Maximum Interstory Drift (MISD) and Residual Interstory Drift (RISD)) were obtained from the analyses. To assist the post-seismic safety assessment of the hybrid buildings, surrogate models for MISD and RISD were developed using Response Surface Methodology and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). By using the ANN surrogate models as fitness functions for the Genetic Algorithm, optimal modeling parameters of the hybrid system were obtained. Secondly, to represent the energy dissipative capacity of the hybrid system, an equivalent viscous damping (EVD) equation was developed. To formulate the EVD equation, 243 single-storey single-bay CLT infilled SMRF models were developed and subjected to monotonic static and semi-static cyclic analysis. The EVD of each model was calculated from the hysteretic responses based on Jacobsen’s area based approach and later calibrated using NLTHA. Finally, an iterative direct displacement based design method was developed for the proposed hybrid structure. A detailed description of the proposed methodology is presented with a numerical example. In order to verify the proposed method, hybrid buildings with 3-, 6-, and 9- storey heights were designed. A calibrated EVD-ductility relationship was used to obtain the energy dissipation of the equivalent SDOF system for all case study buildings. Nonlinear time history analysis using twenty ground motion records was used to validate the performance of the proposed design methodology. The results indicate that the proposed design method effectively controls the displacements resulting from the seismic excitation of the hybrid structure.
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Seismic Design of Floor Diaphragms in Post-Tensioned Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue507
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Author
Moroder, Daniel
Sarti, Francesco
Palermo, Alessandro
Pampanin, Stefano
Buchanan, Andrew
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Walls
Floors
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Frame Elongation
Rocking
Diaphragm
Lateral Load Resisting System
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Seismic damage to floor diaphragms because of displacement incompatibilities are a point of concern in many structures. This paper studies the behaviour of timber diaphragms subjected to frame elongation and rocking of walls in post-tensioned timber buildings. Experimental tests with special connection details between floor panels and between the diaphragm and the lateral load resisting system show that floor damage in severe earthquakes can be avoided by designing for flexibility and proper connection detailing
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Tall Cross-Laminated Timber Building: Design and Performance Session WW300 Experimental and Modeling Studies on Wood Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue618
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dolan, Daniel
Bordry, Vincent
Pei, Shiling
van de Lindt, John
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Damping
Multi-Story
Ductility
Cost
Fire Resistance
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2014
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 3-5, 2014, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is widely perceived as the most promising option for building high-rise wood structures due to its structural robustness and good fire resistance. While gravity load design of a tall CLT building is relatively easy to address because all CLT walls can be utilized as bearing walls, design for significant lateral loads (earthquake and wind) can be challenging due to the lack of ductility in current CLT construction methods that utilize wall panels with low aspect ratios (height to length). Keeping the wall panels at high aspect ratios can provide a more ductile response, but it will inevitably increase the material and labor costs associated with the structure. In this study, a solution to this dilemma is proposed by introducing damping and elastic restoring devices in a multi-story CLT building to achieve ductile response, while keeping the integrity of low aspect ratio walls to reduce the cost of construction and improve fire resistance. The design methodology for incorporating the response modification devices is proposed and the performance of the as-designed structure under seismic is evaluated.
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A Seismic Design of 3-Story Building Using Japanese "Sugi" CLT Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue682
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Matsumoto, Kazuyuki
Miyake, Tatsuya
Haramiishi, Takeshi
Tsuchimoto, Takahiro
Isoda, Hiroshi
Kawai, Naohito
Yasumura, Motoi
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Panels
Sugi
Japan
Dynamic Analysis
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
In this paper, the general process and results of the seismic design on a 3-story building with Japanese Sugi CLT construction based on the time history response analysis as the only legal structural design method in Japan at the present moment, are shown. As a result, it is recognized that the building has enough seismic performance for the regulation of seismic design in Japan
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Connections for CLT Diaphragms in Steel-Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1594
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Joyce, Tom
Smith, Ian
Organization
NEWBuildS
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Steel
Connections
Self-Tapping Screws
Fabrication
Strength
Stiffness
Ductility
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The high performance in-plane of cross laminated timber (CLT) panels has created a potential for the use of CLT members act as diaphragms in steel structures. The behaviour of this diaphragm system depends strongly on the connections involved in linking the panels together and to the steel members. A study of the connections at both locations was made using experimental testing of two connection designs for the panel-to-panel case, and the development of a staggered lag screw connection for the panel-to-steel beam case. The results showed good performance for the double spline and fully-threaded inclined screws panel-to-panel connections. The lag screw connection showed high strength, stiffness, and ductility. The CSA Standard O86-09 was found to best predict the strength of both types of connections. Characteristic design stiffness values were presented for the stiffness at low levels of displacement and the initial, elastic stiffness.
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Experimental Behaviour of Diaphragms in Post-Tensioned Timber Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue95
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Author
Moroder, Daniel
Smith, Tobias
Simonetti, Michele
Carlo Ponzo, Felice
Di Cesare, Antonio
Nigro, Domenico
Pampanin, Stefano
Buchanan, Andrew
Organization
The European Association for Earthquake Engineering
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Turkey
Format
Conference Paper
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Diaphragms
Lateral Loads
Post-Tensioning
Shake Table Test
Testing
Language
English
Conference
Second European Conference on Earthquake Engineering and Seismology
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 25-29, 2014, Istanbul, Turkey
Summary
Floor diaphragms have an important role in the seismic behaviour of structures, as inertia forces are generated by their masses and then transferred to the lateral load resisting system. Diaphragms also link all other structural elements together and provide general stability to the structure. As with most other structural components, there is concern about damage to floor diaphragms because of displacement incompatibilities. This paper describes two different experiments on engineered timber floors connected to post-tensioned timber frames subjected to horizontal loading. First a full scale two-bay post-tensioned frame was loaded with lateral loads through a stressed-skin floor diaphragm. Different connection configurations between the floor units on either side of the central column were tested. Secondly a three dimensional, three storey post-tensioned frame building was tested on a shaking table. The diaphragm consisted of solid timber panels connected to the beams with inclined fully threaded screws. For all tested connections, the diaphragm behaviour was fully maintained throughout the testing and no damage was observed. The test results showed that careful detailing of the floor panel connections near the beam-columnjoint and the flexibility of timber elements can avoid floor damage and still guarantee diaphragm action at high level of drifts in post-tensioned timber frame buildings.
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Technical Guide for the Design and Construction of Tall Wood Buildings in Canada

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2610
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Karacabeyli, Erol
Lum, Conroy
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2014
Format
Book/Guide
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Tall Timber Buildings
Construction
Building Construction
Sustainable Construction
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Building tall in wood is not a new phenomenon. In fact, Canada has a history of constructing tall wood buildings out of heavy timber and brick elements, reaching up to nine storeys. In the early 20th century, with the increase in reinforced concrete and structural steel research and construction, and with growing concerns over fire and durability, the structural use of wood fell out of common use in tall buildings. This trend is beginning to reverse, however. In the last few decades, the world has seen a resurgence of mass timber products and systems that are paving the way for tall wood buildings. This triggered an initiative by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) to support tall wood building demonstration projects to enhance Canada’s position as a global leader in wood building construction, by showcasing the application and performance of advanced wood technologies. The Technical Guide for the Design and Construction of Tall Wood Buildings in Canada has been prepared to assist architects, engineers, code consultants, developers, building owners, and Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) in understanding the unique issues to be addressed when developing and constructing tall wood buildings.
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Progress on the Development of Strong Seismic Resilient Tall CLT Buildings in the Pacific Northwest

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1881
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Pei, Shiling
Berman, Jeffrey
Dolan, Daniel
van de Lindt, John
Ricles, James
Sause, Richard
Blomgren, Hans-Erik
Popovski, Marjan
Rammer, Douglas
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Tall Wood
Seismic Performance
Resilience-Based Seismic Design
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
As urban densification occurs in U.S. regions of high seismicity, there is a natural demand for seismically resilient tall buildings that are reliable, economically viable, and can be rapidly constructed. In urban regions on the west coast of the U.S., specifically the Pacific Northwest, there is significant interest in utilizing CLT in 8-20 story residential and commercial buildings due to its appeal as a potential locally sourced, sustainable and economically competitive building material. In this study, results from a multi-disciplinary discussion on the feasibility and challenges in enabling tall CLT building for the U.S. market were summarized. A three-tiered seismic performance expectations that can be implemented for tall CLT buildings was proposed to encourage the adoption of the system at a practical level. A road map for building tall CLT building in the U.S. was developed, together with three innovative conceptual CLT systems that can help reaching resiliency goals. This study is part of an on-going multi-institution research project funded by National Science Foundation.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Seismic Design of Core-Wall Systems for Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1149
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shafts and Chases
Author
Dunbar, Andrew
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shafts and Chases
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Post-Tensioned
Core-Walls
Quasi-Static
Seismic Loading
Multi-Storey
U-Shaped Flexural Plates
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This thesis discusses the results of experimental tests on two post-tensioned timber core-walls, tested under bi-directional quasi-static seismic loading. The half-scale two-storey test specimens included a stair with half-flight landings. Multi-storey timber structures are becoming increasingly desirable for architects and building owners due to their aesthetic and environmental benefits. In addition, there is increasing public pressure to have low damage structural systems with minimal business interruption after a moderate to severe seismic event. Timber has been used extensively for low-rise residential structures in the past, but has been utilised much less for multi-storey structures, traditionally limited to residential type building layouts which use light timber framing and include many walls to form a lateral load resisting system. This is undesirable for multi-storey commercial buildings which need large open spaces providing building owners with versatility in their desired floor plan. The use of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) panels for multi-storey timber buildings is gaining popularity throughout the world, especially for residential construction. Previous experimental testing has been done on the in-plane behaviour of single and coupled post-tensioned timber walls at the University of Canterbury and elsewhere. However, there has been very little research done on the 3D behaviour of timber walls that are orthogonal to each other and no research to date into post-tensioned CLT walls. The “high seismic option” consisted of full height post-tensioned CLT walls coupled with energy dissipating U-shaped Flexural Plates (UFPs) attached at the vertical joints between coupled wall panels and between wall panels and the steel corner columns. An alternative “low seismic option” consisted of post-tensioned CLT panels connected by screws, to provide a semi-rigid connection, allowing relative movement between the panels, producing some level of frictional energy dissipation.
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Free
Resource Link
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Progress on the Development of Seismic Resilient Tall CLT Buildings in the Pacific Northwest

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue178
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Pei, Shiling
Berman, Jeffrey
Dolan, Daniel
van de Lindt, John
Ricles, James
Sause, Richard
Blomgren, Hans-Erik
Popovski, Marjan
Rammer, Douglas
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Commercial
High-Rise
Residential
US Market
Economical
Sustainable
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
As urban densification occurs in U.S. regions of high seismicity, there is a natural demand for seismically resilient tall buildings that are reliable, economically viable, and can be rapidly constructed. In urban regions on the west coast of the U.S., specifically the Pacific Northwest, there is significant interest in utilizing CLT in 8-20 story residential and commercial buildings due to its appeal as a potential locally sourced, sustainable and economically competitive building material. In this study, results from a multi-disciplinary discussion on the feasibility and challenges in enabling tall CLT building for the U.S. market were summarized. A three-tiered seismic performance expectations that can be implemented for tall CLT buildings was proposed to encourage the adoption of the system at a practical level. A road map for building tall CLT building in the U.S. was developed, together with three innovative conceptual CLT systems that can help reaching resiliency goals. This study is part of an on-going multi-institution research project funded by National Science Foundation
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.