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Lateral Behaviour and Direct Displacement Based Design of a Novel Hybrid Structure: Cross Laminated Timber Infilled Steel Moment Resisting Frames

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue175
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Author
Bezabeh, Matiyas
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Displacement
Frames
Lateral Loads
Model
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Recently, an innovative hybrid structure has been developed as an alternative lateral-load resisting system at The University of British Columbia. The hybrid structure incorporates Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) shear panels as an infill in steel moment resisting frames (SMRFs). In order to increase the applicability of the proposed system, in this thesis, a direct displacement based design methodology has been developed and analytically validated. Initially, a nonlinear time history analysis (NLTHA) was carried out to study the lateral behaviour of the proposed hybrid structure. For this purpose, a total of 162 different hybrid buildings were modeled and analyzed in OpenSees by using twenty earthquake ground motions (2% probability exceedance in 50 years). Post-earthquake performance indicators (Maximum Interstory Drift (MISD) and Residual Interstory Drift (RISD)) were obtained from the analyses. To assist the post-seismic safety assessment of the hybrid buildings, surrogate models for MISD and RISD were developed using Response Surface Methodology and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). By using the ANN surrogate models as fitness functions for the Genetic Algorithm, optimal modeling parameters of the hybrid system were obtained. Secondly, to represent the energy dissipative capacity of the hybrid system, an equivalent viscous damping (EVD) equation was developed. To formulate the EVD equation, 243 single-storey single-bay CLT infilled SMRF models were developed and subjected to monotonic static and semi-static cyclic analysis. The EVD of each model was calculated from the hysteretic responses based on Jacobsen’s area based approach and later calibrated using NLTHA. Finally, an iterative direct displacement based design method was developed for the proposed hybrid structure. A detailed description of the proposed methodology is presented with a numerical example. In order to verify the proposed method, hybrid buildings with 3-, 6-, and 9- storey heights were designed. A calibrated EVD-ductility relationship was used to obtain the energy dissipation of the equivalent SDOF system for all case study buildings. Nonlinear time history analysis using twenty ground motion records was used to validate the performance of the proposed design methodology. The results indicate that the proposed design method effectively controls the displacements resulting from the seismic excitation of the hybrid structure.
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Feasibility Study of Using Cross-Laminated Timber Core for the UBC Tall Wood Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1262
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Moudgil, Manu
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Concrete Core
Seismic Loading
National Building Code of Canada
Mass Timber Core
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Mass-timber has gained popularity in the construction of mid-rise buildings in the last decade. The innovation of constructing tall buildings with mass-timber can be seen in the student residence at Brock Commons built in 2016 at the University of British Columbia. It is the world’s tallest timber hybrid building with 18 stories and 53 meters’ height above the ground level. The building has 17 stories of mass-timber superstructure resting on a concrete podium with two concrete cores that act as a lateral force resisting system for earthquake and wind forces. The mass-timber superstructure of 17 stories took ten weeks whereas the concrete cores were built in fourteen weeks. There could have been a substantial reduction in the project timeline leading to cost savings, if mass-timber was used for the cores. The motivation for concrete cores was driven by the sole purpose of easier approval procedure. The objective of this thesis was to evaluate the possibility to design the Brock Commons building using mass-timber cores. First, the procedure for the approvals for tall timber buildings by understanding the code compliance for Brock Commons is discussed. Then, the actual building with concrete cores is modeled, with the model being calibrated with the results from the structural engineers of record. These concrete cores are then replaced by the same configuration using Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) cores to investigate the structural feasibility of Brock Commons with a mass-timber core. The results presented herein show that Brock Commons with CLT core having the same dimensions and configuration is unstable under seismic loading for Vancouver, BC, as specified by National Building of Canada 2015. However, when the configuration and thickness of CLT cores are changed, the structure can meet the seismic performance criteria as per the code.
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Displacement-Based Design of Reinforced Concrete Moment Resisting Frame Incorporating Cross Laminated Timber Infill and Metallic Damper Connector

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1266
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Madheswaran, Jayanthan
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Displacement-Based Design
Reinforced Concrete
Metallic Damper Connections
Abaqus
Finite Element Model
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This thesis discusses the development of a new innovative reinforced concrete hybrid structure. The hybrid structure consists of reinforced concrete frame incorporated with Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) and metallic damper connections. The seismic design of this proposed system was carried out with the displacement-based design framework and the design was successfully verified. First, this study focused to numerically model the conventional metallic (steel slit) damper and validated with the experimental result using the Abaqus finite element program. Then, to minimize the drawbacks of the conventional damper specimen, a parametric study has been carried out by changing the shape parameters of the damper using the factorial design of experiments. The purpose of conducting a parametric study is to find the appropriate configuration of the damper which can perform well with the proposed hybrid system. Further, the importance of the shape parameter and their interactions in the final response was studied using the response surface method. Secondly, the proposed hybrid system with the metallic damper connection was modeled in Extended Three Dimensional Analysis of Building Systems (ETABS) and then the overall behavior of the system was investigated. In addition, a direct displacement-based design framework was developed for the seismic design of this proposed system. To verify the proposed framework, a 2D six storey hybrid structure was modeled using ETABS. Then, a nonlinear time history analysis was conducted for the modeled structure using 50 set of ground motions to evaluate its performance. The results indicate that the proposed design framework is effective in controlling the displacement of the hybrid system under seismic excitation.
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Energy Based Seismic Design of a Multi-Storey Hybrid Building: Timber-Steel Core Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1271
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Goertz, Caleb
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Core Walls
Multi-Storey
High Seismic Regions
Steel Plates
Equivalent Static Force Procedure
Nonlinear Time History Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This thesis discusses a novel timber-steel core wall system for use in multi-storey buildings in high seismic regions. This hybrid system combines Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) panels with steel plates and connections to provide the required strength and ductility to core walled buildings. The system is first derived from first principles and validated in SAP2000. In order to assess the feasibility of the system it is implemented in the design of a 7-storey building based off an already built concrete benchmark building. The design is carried out following the equivalent static force procedure (ESFP) outlined by the National Building Code of Canada for Vancouver, BC. To evaluate the design bi-directional nonlinear time history analysis (NLTHA) is carried out on the building using a set of 10 ground motions based on a conditional mean spectrum. To improve the applicability of the hybrid system an energy based design methodology is proposed to design the timber-core walled building. The methodology is proposed as it does not rely on empirical formulas and force modification factors to determine the final design of the structure. NLTHA is carried out on the proposed methodology using 10 ground motions to evaluate the suitability of the method and the results are discussed and compared to the ESFP results.
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Connections for Stackable Heavy Timber Modules in Midrise to Tall Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2087
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Modular
Intra-module Connection
Inter-module Vertical Connection
Inter-module horizontal Connection
Mid-Rise
Tall Wood
Screws
Load Transfer
Steel Angle Bracket
Stiffness
Strength
Ductility
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In Phase I (2018-19) of this project on Prefabricated Heavy Timber Modular Construction, three major types of connections used in a stackable modular building were studied: intramodule connection, inter-module vertical connection, and inter-module horizontal connection. The load requirement and major design criteria were identified...
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Force Based Design Guideline for Timber-Steel Hybrid Structures: Steel Moment Resisting Frames with CLT Infill Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue83
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Stiemer, Siegfried
Bezabeh, Matiyas
Goertz, Caleb
Popovski, Marjan
Goda, Katsuichiro
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Overstrength
Ductility
National Building Code of Canada
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Office Buildings
Residential Buildings
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Provincial code changes have been made to allow construction of light wood-frame buildings up to 6 storeys in order to satisfy the urban housing demand in western Canadian cities. It started in 2009 when the BC Building Code was amended to increase the height limit for wood-frame structures from four to six. Recently, provinces of Quebec, Ontario and Alberta followed suit. While wood-frame construction is limited to six storeys, some innovative wood-hybrid systems can go to greater heights. In this report, a feasibility study of timber-based hybrid buildings is described as carried out by The University of British Columbia (UBC) in collaboration with FPInnovations. This project, funded through BC Forestry Innovation Investment's (FII) Wood First Program, had an objective to develop design guidelines for a new steel-timber hybrid structural system that can be used as part of the next generation "steel-timber hybrid structures" that is limited in scope to 20 storey office or residential buildings. ...
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Feasibility Study of Tall Concrete-Timber Hybrid System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1274
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Design and Systems
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Kaushik, Kuldeep
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Wind
Design and Systems
Keywords
Lateral Loads
Gravity Loads
Timber-Concrete Hybrid
Inter-Story Drift
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Although wood is widely used as a construction material, it is mostly limited to low and mid-rise residential construction, partially due to fire code restrictions. This limitation can be overcome by considering hybrid systems which combine wood with non-combustible materials. This research presents an innovative wood-concrete hybrid system, suitable for tall buildings, where a concrete frame with slabs at every third story provides fire separation as well as stiffness and strength to resist gravity and lateral loads. The intermediate stories including their floors are constructed using light-frame wood modules. This approach reduces the environmental footprint of the building, reduces the building weight and therefore the seismic demand on connections and foundation, and speeds up the construction process. For a novel system, numerical modeling is crucial to predicting its structural response to static and dynamic loading. This thesis studies the structural feasibility of the system by developing finite element models and assessing the structural behavior at the component and system levels when subjected to earthquake and wind loads. Nonlinear analyses are performed considering material and geometric nonlinearity using multiple ground motions to estimate the structure’s inter-story drift and base shear. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed wood-concrete hybrid system for tall buildings in high seismic zones.
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Numerical Study of Pin-Supported Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Shear Wall System Equipped with Low-Yield Steel Dampers

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1267
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Author
Ma, Siyao
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Shear Walls
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Low-Rise
Mid-Rise
Rocking Walls
Steel Dampers
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This thesis presents a numerical study of a novel rocking cross-laminated timber (CLT) shear wall system for low- to mid-rise constructions. The system takes advantage of the high in-plane stiffness of CLT coupled with low-yield steel dampers to control the rocking motion of the CLT shear walls during earthquakes. The low-yield steel dampers connected between two rigid CLT wall panels provide the mechanism needed to dissipate the earthquake energy. This concentrates the damage in the dampers, allowing the system to be repaired efficiently after major earthquakes. Numerical models of the CLT shear wall system have been developed using both OpenSees Navigator and ABAQUS software. Models of low-yield steel damper systems were calibrated using available experimental results. With the rigid floor/roof assumption, a simplified OpenSees model of the CLT shear wall system was demonstrated to be effective and reasonably accurate in predicting the response of the system under large excitations. Therefore, it is efficient and reliable to apply the OpenSees model to study the seismic response of CLT shear wall buildings. A case study of a six-storey CLT shear wall building located in Vancouver, Canada was studied; and, detailed parameteric studies were conducted to investigate the influences of the damper type (damper shear strength), number of dampers, damper location, different earthquake records versus target earthquake design response spectrum, and earthquake peak ground acceleration (PGA) on the building response. It was determined that an optimized damper design with comprehensive consideration of these five factors can provide a building with a small roof drift ratio, as well as minor damages on the dampers. Concepts and examples for connection design are also provided.
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Seismic Design of Timber Steel Hybrid High-Rise Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1270
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Xiaoyue
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Timber-Steel Hybrid
FFTT
Seismic Performance
Strength
Stiffness
Ductility
Failure Mechanisms
Force Reduction Factors
High-Rise
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Timber-steel hybrid systems utilize timber as main construction material, but also take advantage of the ductility and stiffness that steel provides. For a novel hybrid system to gain recognition, experimental data must be supported by numerical analysis to predict its structural performance. “Finding the Forest Through the Trees” (FFTT) is one proposal for a timber-steel hybrid system using mass-timber panels as shear walls and floor slabs connected with steel header beams. This thesis presents research to evaluate the seismic performance of the FFTT hybrid system using experimental methods, numerical modeling, and reliability analysis. The FFTT system was investigated on two levels: i) component design, and ii) system design. On the component level, the strength, stiffness, ductility, and failure mechanisms of the two key connections were evaluated experimentally. CLT (Cross Laminated Timber) wall to steel beam connection tests results demonstrated that appropriate connection layouts can lead to the desired failure mechanism while avoiding crushing of the mass-timber panels. For the hold-down connection, a modified HSK (Holz-Stahl-Komposit) assembly with high force and stiffness capacity together with ductile behaviour was proposed. On the system level, the seismic response of the FFTT system with different ductility values was investigated using nonlinear 2D and 3D models subjected to a number of ground motion acceleration records. The seismic reliability with various uncertainties was analysed in order to investigate the FFTT system from a performance based approach. Based on the results, an appropriate seismic force reduction factor specific to the FFTT system was proposed. Finally, a feasibility study confirmed the possibility of the practical application of this system. This thesis can serve as a precursor for developing design guidelines for tall wood-hybrid building systems in seismic regions.
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Mitigating Torsional Irregularity using Cross Laminated Timber-Reinforced Concrete Hybrid System

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1264
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Yazdinezhad, Mahdi
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Interstory Drifts
Reinforced Concrete
Linear Dynamic Analysis
Nonlinear Time History Analysis
Timber-Concrete Hybrid
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Seismic torsional responses in buildings is a result of eccentricity in mass and stiffness distribution. Torsional irregularity is one of the major causes of severe damage and collapse of structures during an earthquake. In this study, effect of torsion on the structures is reviewed, the definition of torsional irregularity and the characteristic of the structure that leads to this type of irregularity is elaborated. The evolution of the methods to consider the effect of torsion in the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC) is reviewed and different methods to prevent torsional irregularity in the structures are discussed. Hybridization with Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) is suggested as a new method to rectify the effect of torsional irregularity for different performance levels. Accordingly, the definition of hybridization and hybrid structure seismic behavior, CLT material specifications and CLT seismic performance is discussed. In order to evaluate the effect of CLT hybridization on buildings with torsional irregularity, a four-storey reinforced concrete (RC) structure with torsional irregularity is considered for Vancouver seismicity condition. SAP2000 software is used to conduct Linear Dynamic Analysis (LDA) and Non-Linear Time History Analysis (NLTHA) using eight different ground motion scaled to Vancouver design spectra. The effect of the CLT wall panel as shear wall on the in plane seismic base shear and inter-storey drift is shown using the linear and non-linear dynamic analysis. The result from the analysis compared to the code static values. The literature of Performance Based Seismic Design (PBSD) is reviewed. PBSD is used to determine the performance level of the original and hybrid building. The inter-storey drifts criteria defined in FEMA 356 guidelines is used for the purpose of NLTHA.
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10 records – page 1 of 1.