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10 records – page 1 of 1.

An Approach to CLT Diaphragm Modeling for Seismic Design with Application to a U.S. High-Rise Project

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1710
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors

An Approach to CLT Diaphragm Modeling for Seismic Design with Application to a U.S. High Rise Project

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1671
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Author
Breneman, Scott
McDonnell, Eric
Zimmerman, Reid
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
US
Diaphragm
Model
High-Rise
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 3844-3852
Summary
A candidate CLT diaphragm analysis model approach is presented and evaluated as an engineering design tool motivated by the needs of seismic design in the United States. The modeling approach consists of explicitly modeling CLT panels as discrete orthotropic shell elements with connections between panels and connections from panels to structural framing modelled as two-point springs. The modeling approach has been compared to a developed CLT diaphragm design example based on U.S. standards showing the ability to obtain matching deflection results. The sensitivity of the deflection calculations to considering CLT panel-to-panel connection gap closure is investigated using a simple diaphragm example. The proposed modeling approach is also applied to the candidate floor diaphragm design for the Framework project, one of the two U.S. Tall Wood Building Prize Competition winners, currently under design. Observations from this effort are that the proposed method, while a more refined model than typically used during building design, shows promise to meet the needs of innovative CLT seismic designs where appropriate simpler diaphragm models are not available.
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Haut - A 21-storey Tall Timber Residential Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2743
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Verhaegh, Rob
Vola, Mathew
de Jong, Jorn
Publisher
KoreaScience
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
Korea
Format
Journal Article
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Tall Timber Buildings
Residential
Netherlands
TCC
Vibration
Holistic Design
Multi-Family
Wind
Stability
High-Rise
Haut
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
International Journal of High-Rise Buildings
Summary
This paper reflects on the structural design of Haut; a 21-storey high-end residential development in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Construction started in 2019 and is in progress at the time of writing. Upon completion in 2021, Haut will be the first residential building in the Netherlands to achieve a 'BREEAM-outstanding' classification. The building will reach a height of 73 m, making it the highest timber structure in the Netherlands. It contains some 14.500 of predominantly residential functions. It features a hybrid concrete-timber stability system and concrete-timber floor panels. This paper describes the concepts behind the structural design for Haut and will touch upon the main challenges that have arisen from the specific combination of characteristics of the project. The paper describes the design of the stability system and -floor system, the analysis of differential movements between concrete and timber structures and wind vibrations. The paper aims to show how the design team has met these specific challenges by implementing a holistic design approach and integrating market knowledge at an early stage of the design.
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Integrating CLT Panels for Building Cores: Introduction, Rocking Response, & Foundation Connection Testing

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1732
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Chapman, John
Ma, Quincy
Pham, Viet
Whitehead, Jaimie
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
High-Rise
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4764-4773
Summary
This research involves testing for a new structural system based on CLT (cross-laminated timber) panels to provide taller, economical and more useful timber high-rise buildings. The point of difference of the system compared to recently constructed CLT high-rise buildings is a central core which is comprised of...
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Construction Management for Tall CLT Buildings: From Partial to Total Prefabrication of Façade Elements

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue224
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Gasparri, Eugenia
Lucchini, Angelo
Mantegazza, Gabriele
Mazzucchelli, Enrico
Publisher
Taylor&Francis Online
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Keywords
High-Rise
Prefabrication
Tall Wood
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood Material Science & Engineering
Notes
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17480272.2015.1075589
Summary
Cross-Laminated Timber is one of the most widely used engineered wood products, thanks to its numerous advantages, among which construction speed is the most appreciated, both by clients and by designers. However, construction scheduling compression refers exclusively to CLT structures, while the rest of the construction process still requires a longer phase to complete vertical enclosures. The aim of the research work presented in this paper is to outline advantages brought about when the degree of envelope prefabrication of tall timber buildings is increased. Results are presented in two sections. The first includes the definition of a case study together with an overview of possible technical details for entirely prefabricated façade solutions, ready to be installed without the need to work via scaffolds. The second deals with construction site management analysis for the case study building, where the determination of specific factors having an influence on time and costs is achieved by varying the prefabrication degree of the various façade configurations and repeating the analysis process. The main findings of this research work demonstrate that comprehensive façade prefabrication allows not only consistent compression of construction scheduling to be achieved, but also for immediate protection of wooden elements from weather agents.
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Feasibility Study of a Wood-Concrete Hybrid Super Tall Building and Optimization of its Wind-Induced Behaviour

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1902
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Frames
Walls
Shafts and Chases

Structural Design and Assembly of "Treet" - a 14-Storey Timber Residential Building in Norway

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1856
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Abrahamsen, Rune
Arne Malo, Kjell
Publisher
New Zealand Timber Design Society
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
New Zealand
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Multi-Storey
Assembly
High-Rise
Modules
Prefabricated
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
New Zealand Timber Design Journal
Online Access
Free
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Progress on the Development of Seismic Resilient Tall CLT Buildings in the Pacific Northwest

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue178
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Seismic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Pei, Shiling
Berman, Jeffrey
Dolan, Daniel
van de Lindt, John
Ricles, James
Sause, Richard
Blomgren, Hans-Erik
Popovski, Marjan
Rammer, Douglas
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Commercial
High-Rise
Residential
US Market
Economical
Sustainable
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
As urban densification occurs in U.S. regions of high seismicity, there is a natural demand for seismically resilient tall buildings that are reliable, economically viable, and can be rapidly constructed. In urban regions on the west coast of the U.S., specifically the Pacific Northwest, there is significant interest in utilizing CLT in 8-20 story residential and commercial buildings due to its appeal as a potential locally sourced, sustainable and economically competitive building material. In this study, results from a multi-disciplinary discussion on the feasibility and challenges in enabling tall CLT building for the U.S. market were summarized. A three-tiered seismic performance expectations that can be implemented for tall CLT buildings was proposed to encourage the adoption of the system at a practical level. A road map for building tall CLT building in the U.S. was developed, together with three innovative conceptual CLT systems that can help reaching resiliency goals. This study is part of an on-going multi-institution research project funded by National Science Foundation
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Free
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Wind-Induced Dynamic Response of a 22-Storey Timber Building: Options for Structural Design of the Hallonbergen Project

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue64
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Wind
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Tjernberg, Frida
Organization
KTH royal institute of technology
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Sweden
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Wind
Keywords
Residential
Tall Wood
Wind Load
High-Rise
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Folkhem is a Swedish company exclusively building timber residential buildings in the Stockholm area. The company is currently in the planning stages of what would be the world’s tallest timber building, a 22-storey timber residential buiding in Hallonbergen, Sundbyberg. In this master thesis, this proposed building has been analyzed with regards to its wind-induced dynamic response. The work includes studies of stabilization of tall structures, case studies of existing buildings and developed systems for tall timber construction and analyzed options for structural design of the Hallonbergen project. Eleven different structural systems have been investigated with regards to their displacement at the top and their peak acceleration when subject to wind loading. The peak acceleration has been calculated using both Eurocode and ISO 4354. The values have been assessed against ISO 6897 and ISO 10137. The results indicate that it is possible to construct the Hallonbergen project without risk of unacceptable dynamic response, using any of the following options; The Martinson’s system with 259 mm CLT plates The Kauffmann system The structural system presented in “The Case for Tall Wood Buildings” The structural system presented in “The Timber Tower Research Project”
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Free
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Measuring-Up In Timber: A Critical Perspective on Mid- and High-Rise Timber Building Design

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue607
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Fleming, Patrick
Smith, Simon
Ramage, Michael
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Mid-Rise
High-Rise
Europe
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
arq: Architectural Research Quarterly
Summary
Architects, engineers and researchers alike often cite practical reasons for building with wood. Since the development of curved glulam beams and columns over a century ago, the widespread use of massive structural timber elements has allowed architects and engineers to design and build in wood with unprecedented speed and scale. Moreover, rising concerns of climate change and the carbon-dioxide emissions associated with construction encourage the use of wood as a viable alternative to steel and concrete, due to CO2 sequestration in trees. In mid- and high-rise buildings, the current shift from steel and concrete towards massive structural timber elements like glulam, laminated-veneer lumber (LVL) and cross-laminated timber (CLT) is evident in a number of recently completed timber buildings in Europe, ranging from seven to nine storeys. Several speculative design proposals have also been made for ‘timber towers’ of thirty, fortytwo and even sixty-five storeys, recognising that designing with massive structural timber elements in high-rise buildings is still in its infancy. This paper offers a new perspective on building with wood at this scale, beyond carbon sequestrationand construction.
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Free
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10 records – page 1 of 1.