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Tall Cross-Laminated Timber Building: Design and Performance Session WW300 Experimental and Modeling Studies on Wood Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue618
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Author
Dolan, Daniel
Bordry, Vincent
Pei, Shiling
van de Lindt, John
Organization
Structures Congress
Publisher
American Society of Civil Engineers
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Damping
Multi-Story
Ductility
Cost
Fire Resistance
Language
English
Conference
Structures Congress 2014
Research Status
Complete
Notes
April 3-5, 2014, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is widely perceived as the most promising option for building high-rise wood structures due to its structural robustness and good fire resistance. While gravity load design of a tall CLT building is relatively easy to address because all CLT walls can be utilized as bearing walls, design for significant lateral loads (earthquake and wind) can be challenging due to the lack of ductility in current CLT construction methods that utilize wall panels with low aspect ratios (height to length). Keeping the wall panels at high aspect ratios can provide a more ductile response, but it will inevitably increase the material and labor costs associated with the structure. In this study, a solution to this dilemma is proposed by introducing damping and elastic restoring devices in a multi-story CLT building to achieve ductile response, while keeping the integrity of low aspect ratio walls to reduce the cost of construction and improve fire resistance. The design methodology for incorporating the response modification devices is proposed and the performance of the as-designed structure under seismic is evaluated.
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Connections for CLT Diaphragms in Steel-Frame Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1594
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Joyce, Tom
Smith, Ian
Organization
NEWBuildS
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Steel
Connections
Self-Tapping Screws
Fabrication
Strength
Stiffness
Ductility
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The high performance in-plane of cross laminated timber (CLT) panels has created a potential for the use of CLT members act as diaphragms in steel structures. The behaviour of this diaphragm system depends strongly on the connections involved in linking the panels together and to the steel members. A study of the connections at both locations was made using experimental testing of two connection designs for the panel-to-panel case, and the development of a staggered lag screw connection for the panel-to-steel beam case. The results showed good performance for the double spline and fully-threaded inclined screws panel-to-panel connections. The lag screw connection showed high strength, stiffness, and ductility. The CSA Standard O86-09 was found to best predict the strength of both types of connections. Characteristic design stiffness values were presented for the stiffness at low levels of displacement and the initial, elastic stiffness.
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Connections for Stackable Heavy Timber Modules in Midrise to Tall Wood Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2087
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Chao
Lee, George
Lam, Frank
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Modular
Intra-module Connection
Inter-module Vertical Connection
Inter-module horizontal Connection
Mid-Rise
Tall Wood
Screws
Load Transfer
Steel Angle Bracket
Stiffness
Strength
Ductility
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In Phase I (2018-19) of this project on Prefabricated Heavy Timber Modular Construction, three major types of connections used in a stackable modular building were studied: intramodule connection, inter-module vertical connection, and inter-module horizontal connection. The load requirement and major design criteria were identified...
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High-Capacity Hold-Down for Tall Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1529
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Xiaoyue
Popovski, Marjan
Tannert, Thomas
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Holz-Stahl-Komposit
Hold-Down
Seismic Load
Strength
Stiffness
Ductility
Failure Mechanisms
Quasi-Static
Monotonic Loading
Reverse Cyclic Loading
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 725-732
Summary
The structural use of wood in North America is dominated by light wood-frame construction used in low-rise and – more recently – mid-rise residential buildings. Mass timber engineered wood products such as laminatedveneer-lumber and cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels enable to use the material in tall and large wood and woodbased hybrid buildings. The prospect of constructing taller buildings creates challenges, one of them being the increasein lateral forces created by winds and earthquakes, thus requiring stronger hold-down devices. This paper summarises the experimental investigation on the performance a high-capacity hold-down for resisting seismic loads in tall timberbased structural systems. The connection consists of the Holz-Stahl-Komposit-System (HSK)™ glued into CLT with the modification that ductile steel yielding was allowed to occur inside the CLT panel. The strength, stiffness, ductility and failure mechanisms of this connection were evaluated under quasi-static monotonic and reversed cyclic loading. The results demonstrate that the modified hold-down-assembly provides a possible solution for use in tall timber-based structures in high seismic zones
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Force Based Design Guideline for Timber-Steel Hybrid Structures: Steel Moment Resisting Frames with CLT Infill Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue83
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Tesfamariam, Solomon
Stiemer, Siegfried
Bezabeh, Matiyas
Goertz, Caleb
Popovski, Marjan
Goda, Katsuichiro
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Overstrength
Ductility
National Building Code of Canada
Timber-Steel Hybrid
Office Buildings
Residential Buildings
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Provincial code changes have been made to allow construction of light wood-frame buildings up to 6 storeys in order to satisfy the urban housing demand in western Canadian cities. It started in 2009 when the BC Building Code was amended to increase the height limit for wood-frame structures from four to six. Recently, provinces of Quebec, Ontario and Alberta followed suit. While wood-frame construction is limited to six storeys, some innovative wood-hybrid systems can go to greater heights. In this report, a feasibility study of timber-based hybrid buildings is described as carried out by The University of British Columbia (UBC) in collaboration with FPInnovations. This project, funded through BC Forestry Innovation Investment's (FII) Wood First Program, had an objective to develop design guidelines for a new steel-timber hybrid structural system that can be used as part of the next generation "steel-timber hybrid structures" that is limited in scope to 20 storey office or residential buildings. ...
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Seismic Design of Cross-Laminated Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1971
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Tannert, Thomas
Follesa, Maurizio
Fragiacomo, Massimo
González Soto, Paulina
Isoda, Hiroshi
Moroder, Daniel
Xiong, Haibei
van de Lindt, John
Publisher
Society of Wood Science and Technology
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Seismicity
Design Standards
Platform-Type Construction
Ductility
Connections
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood and Fiber Science
Summary
The increasing interest in cross-laminated timber (CLT) construction has resulted in multiple international research projects and publications covering the manufacturing and performance of CLT. Multiple regions and countries have adopted provisions for CLT into their engineering design standards and building regulations. Designing and building CLT structures, also in earthquake-prone regions is no longer a domain for early adopters, but is becoming a part of regular timber engineering practice...
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Seismic Design of Timber Steel Hybrid High-Rise Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1270
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Zhang, Xiaoyue
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Application
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Connections
Keywords
Timber-Steel Hybrid
FFTT
Seismic Performance
Strength
Stiffness
Ductility
Failure Mechanisms
Force Reduction Factors
High-Rise
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Timber-steel hybrid systems utilize timber as main construction material, but also take advantage of the ductility and stiffness that steel provides. For a novel hybrid system to gain recognition, experimental data must be supported by numerical analysis to predict its structural performance. “Finding the Forest Through the Trees” (FFTT) is one proposal for a timber-steel hybrid system using mass-timber panels as shear walls and floor slabs connected with steel header beams. This thesis presents research to evaluate the seismic performance of the FFTT hybrid system using experimental methods, numerical modeling, and reliability analysis. The FFTT system was investigated on two levels: i) component design, and ii) system design. On the component level, the strength, stiffness, ductility, and failure mechanisms of the two key connections were evaluated experimentally. CLT (Cross Laminated Timber) wall to steel beam connection tests results demonstrated that appropriate connection layouts can lead to the desired failure mechanism while avoiding crushing of the mass-timber panels. For the hold-down connection, a modified HSK (Holz-Stahl-Komposit) assembly with high force and stiffness capacity together with ductile behaviour was proposed. On the system level, the seismic response of the FFTT system with different ductility values was investigated using nonlinear 2D and 3D models subjected to a number of ground motion acceleration records. The seismic reliability with various uncertainties was analysed in order to investigate the FFTT system from a performance based approach. Based on the results, an appropriate seismic force reduction factor specific to the FFTT system was proposed. Finally, a feasibility study confirmed the possibility of the practical application of this system. This thesis can serve as a precursor for developing design guidelines for tall wood-hybrid building systems in seismic regions.
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Innovative Technology for Mass Timber and Hybrid Modular Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2801
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Wind
Connections
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Organization
Oregon State University
Country of Publication
United States
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Wind
Connections
Keywords
Mass Timber
Modular Construction
Ductility
Overstrength
High-Rise
Tall Wood Buildings
Interdisciplinary Research
Wind Tunnel Test
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Erica Fischer at Oregon State University
Summary
This Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award will create innovative building technology that will enable mass timber modular construction as a building solution to many of the issues the nation's major cities face today. The architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) sector is on the cusp of a significant disruption that will change the way buildings are manufactured, assembled, and designed, the catalyst of which is the integration of building information models (BIM) and automated construction and manufacturing. This disruption will significantly impact structural engineers. With the streamlining of building manufacturing, assembling, and design, engineers will need to take advantage of three opportunities: (1) design for constructability, (2) design for manufacturing, and (3) design for the whole life of the building (considering future modifications, maintenance, and easily replacing parts of the building). Modular construction, as one method to take advantage of these three opportunities, can address labor and housing shortages that exist in almost every U.S. city today and also can provide rapid construction methods for post-disaster reconstruction and additional patient care facilities. This research will contribute to the state of Oregon’s economy, which has made significant investments in mass timber production, manufacturing, and research. This research will be complemented through the development of best practices for using interdisciplinary, collaborative classroom environments to enhance engineering identities of underrepresented minorities and women at the graduate level. This award will support the National Science Foundation (NSF) role in the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program and the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program. The specific goal of this research is to develop a novel framework for robust and ductile mass timber modular construction that can be applied to buildings with varying lateral force resisting systems. Through this framework, the relationship between the rigidity of modular interconnections and overall structural behavior will be investigated. The research objectives of this project are to: (1) quantify the demands in interconnections that provide ductility when the building framing is subjected to combined gravity and lateral forces (seismic and wind); (2) quantify the impact of interconnection configuration and design on the ability of interconnections to meet the strength and serviceability performance criteria for mass timber high-rise modular buildings; (3) quantify ductility and overstrength for mass timber modular construction and explore applicability of conventional seismic performance factors and how these factors influence the adjusted collapse margin ratio for archetype buildings; (4) explore the influence of interconnection stiffness on the behavior of high-rise modular mass timber buildings subjected to wind demands; and (5) explore the relationship between team-focused and interdisciplinary educational practices with engineering identity and knowledge retention. New connection technology will be created and its contribution to the overall building behavior will be investigated through a rigorous testing plan and complex physics-based numerical simulations of archetype buildings subjected to combined gravity and lateral loads (seismic and wind). This research is a critical first step to develop innovative technology that will change how buildings are designed, manufactured, and assembled. This project will enable the Principal Investigator to establish interdisciplinary research, teaching, and mentorship in the area of mass timber and hybrid construction. This research will use the NSF-supported Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI) Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel facility at the University of Florida. Experimental datasets will be archived in the NHERI Data Depot (https://www.DesignSafe-ci.org) and made publicly available.
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Experimental Campaign for the Mechanical Characterization of Connection Systems in the Seismic Design of Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1511
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Casagrande, Daniele
Polastri, Andrea
Sartori, Tiziano
Loss, Cristiano
Chiodega, Manuela
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Capacity
Stiffness
Ductility
Cyclic Loads
Monotonic Loads
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 353-361
Summary
The seismic behaviour of timber buildings is strongly related to the energy dissipation capacity of connections. According to Standard, since timber is characterized by a brittle failure when subjected to tensile or bending actions, the dissipative zones shall be located in joints and connections, whereas timber members themselves shall be regarded as behaving elastically. In order to ensure the global structural ductility, connections and joints shall be able to deform plastically at the associated ductility level without a significant reduction of their resistance under cyclic loads. The paper deals with an experimental campaign for the mechanical characterization of timber connection systems, commonly adopted in Europe, in the seismic design of timber buildings. The main objective was to find out the capacity, the stiffness and the ductility of the tested connections and to investigate their loss of capacity under cyclic loads. The obtained results were analysed in order to understand if the current provisions, reported in Standard for the different typology of traditional connectors, can be adopted in case of connection systems used for seismic purposes, such as hold-down or angle brackets. Their interaction with other structural parts was then investigated testing six fullscale timber walls, subjected to monotonic and cyclic loads. The tests were carried out at the Laboratory of Materials and Structural Testing of the Trento University (Italy).
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Design of Timber-Concrete Composite Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1936
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Connections
Serviceability
Design and Systems
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite

10 records – page 1 of 1.