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Influence of Openings on the Shear Strength and Stiffness of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2710
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Shear Walls
Author
Aljuhmani, Ahmad
Ogasawawra, A.
Atsuzawa, E.
Alwashali, Hamood
Shegay, A. V.
Tafheem, Zasiah
Maeda, Masaki
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Shear Walls
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Diagonal Compression Test
Openings
Lateral Strength
In-Plane Shear Stiffness
Panels
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Earthquake Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In the last decade, cross laminated timber (CLT) has been receiving increasing attention as a promising construction material for multi-storey structures in areas of high seismicity. In Japan, application of CLT in building construction is still relatively new; however, there is increasing interest in CLT from researchers as well as construction companies. Furthermore, the Japanese government is providing construction cost subsidies for new CLT structures as it is a carbon neutral and sustainable material. The high shear and compressive strength of CLT makes it a good candidate for use as shear walls in mid-rise buildings. One important aspect of CLT walls, and one that is presently poorly understood, is the influence of openings on the shear carrying capacity. Openings are often necessary in CLT panels either in form of windows, doors, lift shaft openings or installation of building services. Concerning this aspect, the code regulations in Japan are relatively strict, such that if openings exceeded certain prescribed limits, the entire CLT panel is considered as a non-structural element, and its contribution to lateral strength is totally ignored. Furthermore, as the maximum opening size is usually governed by edge distance constraints, the size of openings that designers can use is inevitably limited by the standard sizes supplied by the manufacturers. As a result, designers are obligated to adopt very small opening size. This is thought to be a very conservative approach. The main purpose of this paper is to experimentally evaluate the influence of openings on seismic capacity; strength and stiffness reduction, as well as failure mode with changing opening size and opening aspect ratio. In addition, check the validity of the Japanese code regulations with regards to openings in CLT panels. In this study, six 5-layer CLT panels containing different openings were tested. The parameters considered include the size and layout of the opening. The panels were specifically designed with openings that would render them ineffective in resisting lateral loads according to the Japanese standard. However, in addition to the six panels, one panel without openings and one panel with openings that meet the Japanese standard was designed. All the CLT panels were tested in uniaxial diagonal compression in order to simulate pure shear loading. The CLT panels and the loading setup were designed such that the resulting failure mode will be governed by a shear mechanism. The main focus of the experiment was to relate the deterioration of the lateral strength and stiffness of the panels to the size and layout of the opening. The results showed that the panels with openings with the same area have relatively different failure direction and reduction factors for panel shear strength and stiffness, and that is due to the shear weak and strong direction that CLT panels have. Also, the effect of openings on the reduction of stiffness for CLT panels was found to be greater than their effect on the reduction of shear strength. The prescribed equation in the Japanese CLT Guidebook underpredicts stiffness reduction, and has discrepancies with regard to strength as the difference of panel strengths in weak and strong directions are not considered.
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Flexural Performance of Novel Nail-Cross-Laminated Timber Composite Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2649
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Zhang, Yannian
Nehdi, Moncef
Gao, Xiaohan
Zhang, Lei
Publisher
MDPI
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Design and Systems
Keywords
Panels
Flexural Performance
Nails
Bending
Model
Prediction
Fracture
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Applied Sciences
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is an innovative wood panel composite that has been attracting growing interest worldwide. Apart from its economic benefits, CLT takes full advantage of both the tensile strength parallel to the wood grain and its compressive strength perpendicular to the grain, which enhances the load bearing capacity of the composite. However, traditional CLT panels are made with glue, which can expire and lose effectiveness over time, compromising the CLT panel mechanical strength. To mitigate such shortcomings of conventional CLT panels, we pioneer herein nail-cross-laminated timber (NCLT) panels with more reliable connection system. This study investigates the flexural performance of NCLT panels made with different types of nails and explores the effects of key design parameters including the nail incidence angle, nail type, total number of nails, and number of layers. Results show that NCLT panels have better flexural performance than traditional CLT panels. The failure mode of NCLT panels depends on the nail angle, nail type, and quantity of nails. A modified formula for predicting the flexural bearing capacity of NCLT panels was proposed and proven accurate. The findings could blaze the trail for potential applications of NCLT panels as a sustainable and resilient construction composite for lightweight structures.
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Diagrams for Stress and Deflection Prediction in Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Panels with Non-Classical Boundary Conditions

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2719
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Obradovic, Nikola
Todorovic, Marija
Marjanovic, Miroslav
Damnjanovic, Emilija
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Stress
Deflection
Eurocode 5
Layerwise Plate Theory
Panels
Language
English
Conference
International Conference on Contemporary Theory and Practice in Construction
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Invention of cross-laminated timber (CLT) was a big milestone for building with wood. Due to novelty of CLT and timber’s complex mechanical behavior, the existing design codes cover only rectangular CLT panels, simply supported along 2 parallel or all 4 edges, making numerical methods necessary in other cases. This paper presents a practical engineering tool for stress and deflection prediction of CLT panels with non-classical boundary conditions, based on the software for the computational analysis of laminar composites, previously developed by the authors. Diagrams applicable in engineering practice are developed for some common cases. The presented methodology could be a basis for more detailed design handbooks and guidelines for various layouts of CLT panels and different types of loadings.
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Fire Tests of South African Cross-laminated Timber Wall Panels: Fire Ratings, Charring Rates, and Delamination

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2442
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Fire
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
van der Westhuyzen, S.
Walls, R.
de Koker, N.
Publisher
Scientific Elecronic Library Online (SciELO) South Africa
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
South Africa
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Fire
Keywords
Structural Fire Engineering
Charring Rate
Delamination
Panels
Pine
Eucalyptus
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of the South African Institution of Civil Engineering
Online Access
Free
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Shear Modulus Analysis of Cross-Laminated Timber Using Picture Frame Tests and Finite Element Simulations

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2692
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Turesson, Jonas
Berg, Sven
Björnfot, Anders
Ekevad, Mats
Publisher
Springer
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Shear Modulus
Finite Element Simulation
Picture Frame Test
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Materials and Structures
Summary
Determining the mechanical properties of cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels is an important issue. A property that is particularly important for CLT used as shear walls in buildings is the in-plane shear modulus. In this study, a method to determine the in-plane shear modulus of 3- and 5-layer CLT panels was developed based on picture frame tests and a correction factor evaluated from finite element simulations. The picture frame test is a biaxial test where a panel is simultaneously compressed and tensioned. Two different testing methods are simulated by finite elements: theoretical pure shear models as a reference cases and picture frame models to simulate the picture frame test setup. An equation for calculating the shear modulus from the measured shear stiffnesses in the picture frame tests is developed by comparisons between tests and finite element simulations of the CLT panels. The results show that pure shear conditions are achieved in the central region of the panels. No influence from the size of the tested panels is observed in the finite element simulations.
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Cross Laminated Timber Shear Wall Connections for Seismic Applications

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2405
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Falk, Michael
Publisher
Kansas State University
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Panels
Earthquake
Rocking Walls
Shear Walls
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Cross Laminated Timber Shear Wall Connections for Seismic Applications

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2406
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Falk, Michael
Publisher
Kansas State University
Year of Publication
2020
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Connections
Seismic
Keywords
Panels
Earthquake
Rocking Walls
Shear Walls
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Bending, Shear, and Compressive Properties of Three- and Five-Layer Cross-Laminated Timber Fabricated with Black Spruce

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2589
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
He, Minjuan
Sun, Xiaofeng
Li, Zheng
Feng, Wei
Publisher
SpringerOpen
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Black Spruce
Panels
Bending
Thickness
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Journal of Wood Science
Summary
Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is an innovative engineering wood product made by gluing layers of solid-sawn lumber at perpendicular angles. The commonly used wood species for CLT manufacturing include spruce-pine-fir (SPF), douglas fir-larch, and southern pine lumber. With the hope of broadening the wood species for CLT manufacturing, the purposes of this study include evaluating the mechanical properties of black spruce CLT and analyzing the influence of CLT thickness on its bending or shear properties. In this paper, bending, shear, and compressive tests were conducted respectively on 3-layer CLT panels with a thickness of 105 mm and on 5-layer CLT panels with a thickness of 155 mm, both of which were fabricated with No. 2-grade Canadian black spruce. Their bending or shear resisting properties as well as the failure modes were analyzed. Furthermore, comparison of mechanical properties was conducted between the black spruce CLT panels and the CLT panels fabricated with some other common wood species. Finally, for both the CLT bending panels and the CLT shear panels, their numerical models were developed and calibrated with the experimental results. For the CLT bending panels, results show that increasing the CLT thickness whilst maintaining identical span-to-thickness ratios can even slightly reduce the characteristic bending strength of the black spruce CLT. For the CLT shear panels, results show that increasing the CLT thickness whilst maintaining identical span-to-thickness ratios has little enhancement on their characteristic shear strength. For the CLT bending panels, their effective bending stiffness based on the Shear Analogy theory can be used as a more accurate prediction on their experiment-based global bending stiffness. The model of the CLT bending specimens is capable of predicting their bending properties; whereas, the model of the CLT shear specimens would underestimate their ultimate shear resisting capacity due to the absence of the rolling shear mechanism in the model, although the elastic stiffness can be predicted accurately. Overall, it is attested that the black spruce CLT can provide ideal bending or shear properties, which can be comparable to those of the CLT fabricated with other commonly used wood species. Besides, further efforts should focus on developing a numerical model that can consider the influence of the rolling shear mechanism.
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Numerical Analysis of Self-Centring Cross-Laminated Timber Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2714
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Author
Slotboom, Christian
Publisher
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Seismic
Keywords
Self-Centring
Model
Finite Element Model
Lumped Plasticity Elements
Fibre-Based Elements
Monotonic Loading Tests
Cyclic Loading Tests
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Self-centring Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) walls are a low damage seismic force resisting system, which can be used to construct tall wood buildings. This study examines two approaches to model self-centring CLT walls, one that uses lumped plasticity elements, and another that uses fibre-based elements. Finite element models of self-centring CLT walls are developed using the Python interpreter of Opensees, OpenSeesPy, and tested under monotonic and reverse cyclic loading conditions. Outputs from the analysis are compared with data from two existing experimental programs. Both models accurately predict the force displacement relationship of the wall in monotonic loading. For reverse cyclic loading, the lumped plasticity model could not capture cyclic deterioration due to crushing of CLT. Both models slightly overpredict the post-tension force. Sensitivity analyses were run on the fibre model, which show the wall studied is not sensitive to the shear stiffness of CLT. OpenSeesPy models are also created of a two-story structure, which is tested dynamically under a suite of ground motions. The structure is based on a building tested as part of the NHERI TallWood initiative. During testing the foundation of the building was found to be inadvertently flexible. To determine the appropriate model parameters for this foundation, calibrations were performed by running a sequence of OpenSeesPy analyses with an optimization algorithm. Outputs from the lumped plasticity and fibre models were compared to experimental results, which showed that both could capture the global behaviour of the system with reasonable accuracy. Both models overpredict peak post-tension forces. The suite of analyses is then run again on the building to predict the performance with a rigid foundation. Cyclic deterioration is more significant for the building with a rigid foundation, and as a result the fibre mode is more accurate.
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Feasibility of Cross Laminated Timber Panels in Construction: A Case Study of Carbon12

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2594
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Graber, Erik
Publisher
California Polytechnic State University
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Keywords
Mid-Rise
Case Study
Cost comparison
Concrete Slab
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) is an extremely strong engineered wood panel intended for roof, floor, or wall applications. Currently there is little research comparing CLT to steel and concrete, materials CLT hopes to replace This research uses a detailed literary analysis on CLT and case study on Carbon12, a recently constructed CLT structure in Portland, Oregon, to compare the cost and schedule requirements of CLT with a cast-in-place concrete slab. The case study consisted of a detailed analysis of Carbon12, interview with Scott Noble, senior project manager for Carbon12, and a detailed schedule and cost analysis. Results showed that for a concrete floor system used on Carbon12, material costs were far less than costs for a CLT floor system and labor costs were far greater than costs for a CLT floor system. For the schedule analysis, results showed that a concrete floor system would add an additional 10 weeks to the construction schedule of Carbon12. These results led to the conclusion that CLT is a feasible building material for dense, urban, mid-rise structures similar to Carbon12. The quick installation time, small crew, and environmental benefits of CLT outweigh the added costs of the material.
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10 records – page 1 of 1.