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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Performance Based Tests on Cross Laminated Timber - Concrete Composite Floor Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1423
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors

Mechanical Properties of Cross-laminated Timber (CLT) Panels Composed of Treated Dimensional Lumber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2423
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Floors
Author
Tripathi, Sachin
Publisher
Mississippi State University
Year of Publication
2019
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Floors
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Panels
Rolling Shear
Preservative
Adhesives
Southern Yellow Pine
Out-of-Plane Load
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Strut and Tie Modelling of Cross-Laminated Timber Panels Incorporating Angular Material Properties

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue248
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Pearson, Hannah
Organization
University of Bath
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Grain Angles
Strut and Tie Model
Panels
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The use of Cross-Laminated Timber products has increased in recent years with a range of structural applications including CLT tall buildings and folded structures. As CLT is used in more innovative structural applications the need for specific methods of design and analysis are apparent. A review of the literature demonstrates that despite the increasing popularity of CLT in construction there are limited methods for the design and analysis of CLT panels and structures that fully utilise its unique properties. Manufacturer data relating to the CLT material properties varies how the cross directional laminas are considered. Finally it was found that there is limited published knowledge regarding CLT material properties for panels loaded non-tangentially to the direction of the timber grain. A method for predicting failure loads and modes has been presented and compared with experimental test data. A Strut and Tie model is proposed for the analysis of CLT panels, a methodology originally developed to design of reinforced concrete deep beams. The Strut and Tie approach considers panel geometry, loads, supports, different properties in tension and compression and was adapted to consider anisotropic behaviour. The procedure, advantages and limitations have been presented and a model developed for an application in CLT. The use of this model is considered for the analysis of simple CLT panel loadings. The behaviour of CLT at different timber grain angles demonstrate a complex composite behaviour influencing the strut and tie capacities. The definition of node sizes was also found to be critical to the definitions of the struts and ties and hence the capacity of the sections. Comparison of experimental tests to the model demonstrates some application to using a Strut and Tie in CLT panels. It identifies where additional investigation is required to improve, develop and validate the model into a method that may be used for full-scale CLT panels and structures in design practice and consider a variety of geometries and loading arrangements.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Elevated Temperature Effects on the Shear Performance of a Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Wall-to-Floor Bracket Connection

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2106
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Fire
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Walls
Floors

Hollow Massive Timber Panels: A High-Performance, Long-Span Alternative to Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue701
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Author
Montgomery, William
Organization
Clemson University
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Hollow Massive Timber
Pine
Shear Tests
Screws
Emulsion Polymer Isocyanate
Long Span
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Since the development of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), there has been a surge in interest in massive timber buildings. Furthermore, recent conceptual and feasibility designs of massive timber towers of 30 or more stories indicate that performance of mass timber structural elements can compete with other building materials in the commercial industry (MGB Architecture and Design et al.). However, in order for massive timber to penetrate the commercial market even further, a solution is needed for long-span massive timber floor systems. Unfortunately, CLT falls short in this area and is unable to span long distances. The hollow massive timber (HMT) panel presented in this thesis offers one potential long-span solution.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Optimized Utilization of Raw Materials for Production of Cross Laminated Timber: Quality of Laminations and its Effects on Mechanical Properties of Multi-layer Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2401
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors

Experimental Investigations of Shear Connections with Self-Tapping-Screws for Cross-Laminated-Timber Panels

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2295
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Behavior of Cross-Laminated Timber Diaphragm Panel-to-Panel Connections with Self-Tapping Screws

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1422
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Sullivan, Kyle
Organization
Oregon State University
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Seismic
Keywords
Lateral Load Resisting System
Monotonic Tests
Cyclic Tests
Strength
Stiffness
Self-Tapping Screws
International Building Code
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The goal of this project is to contribute to the development of design values for cross-laminated timber (CLT) diaphragms in the seismic load-resisting system for buildings. Monotonic and cyclic tests to determine strength and stiffness characteristics of 2.44 m (8 ft) long shear connections with common self-tapping screws were performed. Understanding and quantifying the behavior of these shear connections will aid in developing design provisions in the National Design Specification for Wood Construction and the International Building Code so structural engineers can use CLT more confidently in lateral force-resisting systems and extend the heights of wood buildings. Experimental strength-to-design strength ratios were in the range of 2.1 to 8.7. In the ASCE 41 acceptance criteria analysis, the m-factors for the Life Safety performance level in cyclic tests ranged from 1.6 to 1.8 for surface spline connections and from 0.9 to 1.7 for cyclic half-lap connections. The half-lap connections, where screws were installed in withdrawal, shear, shear, and withdrawal, performed exceptionally well with both high, linear-elastic, initial stiffness, and ductile, post-peak behavior.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

In-Plane Shear Performance of Cross-laminated Timber and Cross-laminated Timber Concrete Composite Diaphragm Connection Systems

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2241
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Timber-Concrete Composite

Utilization of Low-Value Lumber from Small-Diameter Timber Harvested in Pacific Northwest Forest Restoration Programs in Hybrid Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) Core Layers: Technical Feasibility

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1425
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Lawrence, Christina
Organization
Oregon State University
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Small Diameter
Low-Grade
North America
Modulus of Elasticity
Modulus of Rupture
Three Point Bending Test
Rolling Shear Strength
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Creating a value-added product using low-grade lumber produced from small-diameter timber would improve the economic balance for forest restoration operation. The general aim of this research was to increase or stimulate markets for wood products utilizing low-value small-diameter material generated in National Forest System restoration programs. Our hypothesis is that low-value lumber cut from small-diameter logs (4”-6” at the small end) could be successfully utilized in core layers of structural cross laminated timber (CLT) panels. However, to be qualified for structural uses, CLT must meet standard minimum bond integrity criteria specified by the North American product standard (ANSI/APA PRG 320-2012), determined through laboratory testing for delamination (=5%) and shear resistance (=80% wood failure). The objective of this project was to determine the feasibility of small-diameter logs harvested from National Forest System restoration programs in 3- and 5ply CLT panels. Adding value to low-value timber harvested from USFS lands by using it within CLT applications is expected to increase profitability of the harvested timber, offsetting costs for the restoration programs. The specific objectives were to: (1) build and test CLT panels utilizing lumber from forest restoration operations in core layers of panels against the certification criteria per PRG 320-2012 to allow low-grade lumber in cores of structural CLT; (2) based on findings, propose respective changes to the current North American standard PRG 320-2012; and (3) investigate the efficiency of the primary processing of small-logs from the thinnings and lamination options with lumber produced from these small logs.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.