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Structural Performance Monitoring Technology and Data Visualization Tools and Techniques – Featured Case Study: UBC Tallwood House

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2342
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Author
Mustapha, Gamal
Khondoker, Khaleed
Higgins, James
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Columns
Floors
Topic
Moisture
Serviceability
Keywords
Moisture Performance
Vertical Movement
Prefabrication
Language
English
Conference
International Conference on New Horizons in Green Civil Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Wood structures such as the Wood Innovation and Design Center in Prince George and the UBC Tallwood House, an 18 storey, 53-meter-tall mass timber hybrid building are examples of new and innovative wood structures that encompass new construction techniques, unique materials and novel building practices. Empirical data on the condition of critical components and access to the real-time status of the structure during construction gives Architects, Engineers and Contractors critical information to make informed decisions to either validate or improve the construction plan. Data recorded during the life of the building helps validate the design decisions and proves the viability and feasibility of the design. Methods and practices used to monitor both the moisture performance of prefabricated cross laminate timber (CLT) as well as the vertical movement sensing of the building during and after construction are explored in this paper. Moisture content of the CLT panels has been recorded from manufacturing and prefabrication to storage, through transport and during installation and will continue throughout the service life of the building. The calculated and expected displacement of the wood columns is scheduled to take several years as the structure settles, however a first-year analysis and extrapolation of the data was conducted. Monitoring during transport, storage, and construction proved that CLT panels were resilient to moisture issues while in the manufacturers storage, but prone to direct exposure to moisture-related problems regardless of the precautions taken on site. Despite construction during typical Pacific Northwest rain, informed decisions were made to ensure the panel moisture content could decrease to acceptable ranges before continuing to secondary construction phases. The moisture trends observed in the building were proportional to the control samples as both were subjected to similar environmental conditions.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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A Methodological Approach for Structural Health Monitoring of Mass-Timber Buildings Under Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2519
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Serviceability
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
MPP (Mass Plywood Panel)
Application
Wood Building Systems

Feasibility of Cross-Laminated Timber Cores for the UBC Tall Wood Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1905
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Shafts and Chases

Feasibility Study of Using Cross-Laminated Timber Core for the UBC Tall Wood Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1262
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Author
Moudgil, Manu
Organization
University of British Columbia
Year of Publication
2017
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Hybrid Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Concrete Core
Seismic Loading
National Building Code of Canada
Mass Timber Core
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Mass-timber has gained popularity in the construction of mid-rise buildings in the last decade. The innovation of constructing tall buildings with mass-timber can be seen in the student residence at Brock Commons built in 2016 at the University of British Columbia. It is the world’s tallest timber hybrid building with 18 stories and 53 meters’ height above the ground level. The building has 17 stories of mass-timber superstructure resting on a concrete podium with two concrete cores that act as a lateral force resisting system for earthquake and wind forces. The mass-timber superstructure of 17 stories took ten weeks whereas the concrete cores were built in fourteen weeks. There could have been a substantial reduction in the project timeline leading to cost savings, if mass-timber was used for the cores. The motivation for concrete cores was driven by the sole purpose of easier approval procedure. The objective of this thesis was to evaluate the possibility to design the Brock Commons building using mass-timber cores. First, the procedure for the approvals for tall timber buildings by understanding the code compliance for Brock Commons is discussed. Then, the actual building with concrete cores is modeled, with the model being calibrated with the results from the structural engineers of record. These concrete cores are then replaced by the same configuration using Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) cores to investigate the structural feasibility of Brock Commons with a mass-timber core. The results presented herein show that Brock Commons with CLT core having the same dimensions and configuration is unstable under seismic loading for Vancouver, BC, as specified by National Building of Canada 2015. However, when the configuration and thickness of CLT cores are changed, the structure can meet the seismic performance criteria as per the code.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Feasibility Study of Mass-Timber Cores for the UBC Tall Wood Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1895
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Environmental Impact
Seismic
Wind
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Shafts and Chases

Structural Health Monitoring and Post-Occupancy Performance of Mass Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2290
Topic
Serviceability
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
TallWood Design Institute
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Durability
Monitoring
Livability
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Mariapaola Riggio.
Summary
A key question about new generation taller wood buildings is how they will perform over time in terms of durability and livability. This project will determine how best to measure these qualities by selecting sensors, determining testing and measurement protocols, and implementing testing assemblies in selected CLT buildings in Oregon. Future research will use the knowledge developed through this project to carry out post-occupancy monitoring, generating valuable new insights into building performance.
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Monitoring Building Climate and Timber Moisture Gradient in Large-Span Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue108
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Gamper, Andreas
Dietsch, Philipp
Winter, Stefan
Editor
Bettina Franke Steffen Franke
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Switzerland
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Keywords
Cracks
Damage
Equilibrium Moisture Content
Internal Climate
Lamellas
Large Span
Long-term
Relative Humidity
Shrinkage
Swelling
Temperature
Language
English
Conference
COST Workshop – Highly Performing Timber Structures: Reliability, Assessment, Monitoring and Strengthening
Research Status
Complete
ISSN
2190-5479
Summary
The evaluation of damages in large-span timber structures indicates that the predominantly observed damage pattern is pronounced cracking in the lamellas of glued-laminated timber elements. A significant proportion of these cracks is attributed to the seasonal and use-related variations of the internal climate within large buildings and the associated inhomogeneous shrinkage and swelling processes in the timber elements. To evaluate the significance of these phenomena, long-term measurements of climatic conditions and timber moisture content were taken within large-span timber structures in buildings of typical construction type and use. These measurements were then used to draw conclusions on the magnitude and time necessary for adjustment of the moisture distribution to changing climatic conditions. A comparison of the results for different types of building use confirms the expected large range of possible climatic conditions in buildings with timber structures. Ranges of equilibrium moisture content representative of the type and use of building were obtained. These ranges can be used in design to condition the timber to the right value of moisture content, in this way reducing the crack formation due to moisture variations. The results of this research also support the development of suitable monitoring systems which could be applied in form of early warning systems on the basis of climate measurements. Based on the results obtained, proposals for the practical implementation of the results are given.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Ontario’s Climate Resilient Tall Wood Buildings and Structures: An Evaluation of the Impacts of Climate Change on Mass Timber/Tall Wood

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2289
Topic
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
National Research Council Canada, Canadian Construction Materials Centre
Country of Publication
Canada
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Serviceability
Keywords
Climate Change
Extreme Weather
Mass Timber
Tall Wood
Deterioration
Durability
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contact is Philip Rizcallah.
Summary
The research conducted will provide new climatic data which takes into account certain extreme weather events being attributed to climate change to minimize and/or prevent the risk of failure of tall wood buildings and mass timber structures. The project will offer guidance on the design for durability of tall wood building enclosures and fill existing gaps in knowledge about the extent of the effects of the future climate conditions and extreme weather events (e.g. heat waves, rainfalls, wind storms, etc.) on the resistances to deterioration of building materials, air leakage, vapour diffusion, and water ingress.
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Vertical Movement Monitoring in Six-Storey Wood-Frame Building in British Columbia

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1872
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Wang, Jieying
Organization
FPInnovations
Publisher
BC Housing Research Centre
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Keywords
Moisture Content
Vertical Movement
Mid-Rise
Load
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

Expanding the Cross-Laminated Timber Market through Building Moisture Monitoring and Improved Modeling

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue719
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Organization
Colorado School of Mines
Forest Products Laboratory
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Serviceability
Moisture
Keywords
Moisture Content
Building Envelope
Climate
Hygrothermal Models
Long-term
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contacts are Shiling Pei (Colorado School of Mines) and Samuel L. Zelinka (Forest Products Laboratory)
Summary
This project will generate three benchmark data sets for multistory CLT building moisture performance in different climate zones. Data will include moisture contents at key wood components and high moisture risk locations throughout the buildings. A relatively simple, but fully validated, numerical model for analyzing similar building moisture performance will be recommended. These results will be useful for structural engineers and architects to accurately consider moisture in their design of mass timber buildings.
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.