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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Environmental and Economic Evaluation of Small-Scale Bridge Repair Using Cross-Laminated Timber Floor Slabs

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2397
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans

Wood Design Manual 2017

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2160
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Fire
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
PSL (Parallel Strand Lumber)
Light Frame (Lumber+Panels)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Bridges and Spans
Columns
Floors
Ceilings
Arches
Shear Walls
Trusses
Walls

Laboratory Investigation of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Decks for Bridge Applications

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2557
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Organization
Forest Products Laboratory
Iowa State University
Country of Publication
United States
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Bridge Decks
Serviceability
Structural Performance
Research Status
In Progress
Notes
Project contacts are James Wacker at the Forest Products Laboratory, Justin Dahlberg and Brent Phares at Iowa State University
Summary
The use of cross-laminated timber (CLT) has gained popularity over the past decade, with many advances stemming from completed research and construction projects in Europe. Many inherent advantages of CLT (such as, it is prefabricated, relatively lightweight, dimensionally stable, and environmentally sustainable) have been utilized in vertical construction projects. Despite these advances, the use of CLT in bridge structures has been limited, and the adoption of CLT into governing design codes has been slow. However, CLT shows promise as a complementary or alternative construction material in bridge decks, and additional research would help characterize the structural attributes of CLT decks to guide their use in bridge projects.
Resource Link
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Experimental and Numerical Investigations of the Relevant Parameters on the Bending Resistance of Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1128
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans

Innovative Strategies to Protect Concrete Bridge Decks and Cross-Laminated Timber Structures through the Use of Impermeable Overlays

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2281
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Moisture
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Floors

Evaluation of Bending Performance of Nail Laminated and Dowel Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2309
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Material
NLT (Nail-Laminated Timber)
DLT (Dowel Laminated Timber)
Application
Floors
Walls
Roofs
Bridges and Spans
Wood Building Systems

Ontario Wood Bridge Reference Guide

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2132
Year of Publication
2017
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans

Designing Pedestrian Stress-Laminated Timber Bridges for Multiple Spans: Parameters Related to Dynamic Response

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2576
Year of Publication
2019
Topic
Design and Systems
Application
Bridges and Spans

Flexural Strengthening of Composite Bridge Glued Laminated Timber Beams-Concrete Plate Using CFRP Layers

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2587
Year of Publication
2020
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Mujiman, M
Igustiany, F
Hakiki, R
Publisher
IOP Publishing Ltd
Year of Publication
2020
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
CFRP
Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer
Flexural Strength
Stiffness
Ductility
Reinforcement
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering
Summary
The timber bridge design although economical, often has difficulty producing enough rigidity so that a solution is needed to solve it. The use of CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer) as a reinforcement of structural elements if properly designed and implemented can produce an effective and efficient composite structure. The experimental study aims to analyse the strength, stiffness and ductility of flexural strengthening composite bridge glued laminated timber beams-concrete plates using CFRP layers. The dimensions of the composite glued laminated timber beams 100/180 mm and concrete plate 75/300 mm with a length of 2,480 mm. The number of specimens is 3 composite glued laminated timber beams-concrete plate consisting of 1 test beam without CFRP reinforcement, 1 test beam with one layer CFRP reinforcement, and 1 test beam with three layer CFRP reinforcement. Experimental testing of flexural loads is done with two load points where each load is placed at 1/3 span length. The test results show that the strength of composite laminated timber beams glued - concrete plates BN; BL-1; BL-2 in a row 81.32; 82.82; 82.69 kN/mm; stiffness in a row 7.51; 8.22; 6.32 kN/mm and successive ductility of 16.67; 28.83; 20.21.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Assessing the Market Opportunity for Treated Glued Wood Products

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2635
Year of Publication
2010
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Author
Fell, David
Toosi, B.
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2010
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Bridges and Spans
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Poles
Sound Abatement Barriers
Market Analysis
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
In this study market opportunities for treated glue-laminated (glulam) products were investigated in the industrial wood sector. The main benefits of treated glulam are through-product treatment and the ability to manufacture treated products in shapes and sizes that do not fit into common treating chambers. These attributes provide for very durable and large glulam structures that are appropriate for outdoor use. For these reasons bridges, power poles, and sound abatement barriers were investigated. These are markets where wood has lost market share to or is being challenged by concrete and steel substitutes. The vehicular bridge market was once heavy to the use of wood. Today wood accounts for only 7% of the number bridges in the US and less than 0.9% of the actual surface area of bridges in place. In interviewing municipalities in Canada it is clear that wood is not the preferred material with many wood bridges being replaced by concrete. Further, none of the municipalities contacted were planning wood bridges. However, wood bridges are still being installed. In the US 0.9% of the bridges installed by area in 2007 were wood. This is good news as wood is holding its market share. Steering clear of high volume or large bridges, local bridges are well suited for wood as they are plentiful, small in scale, and many are in disrepair. If 20% of local bridges were built with wood in Canada this would have equalled approximately $51 million in wood bridge construction in 2007. Municipalities are much more open to the use of wood for pedestrian bridges and overpasses. Their quick construction and aesthetics are positive attributes in this application. One municipality contacted is planning multiple wood pedestrian bridges in the next five years. However, for the purpose of this market review there is little published information on pedestrian bridges. Noise abatement barriers are a good high-volume technical fit for treated glulam. Increases in traffic and current road infrastructure improvements will lead to more demand for sound abatement in the future. This market is dominated by concrete, but at a very high price. If treated glulam can give adequate durability and sound performance properties it would be approximately 20% cheaper than concrete. The market for sound barriers in Canada could utilize up to 10 mmbf of wood per year to construct 80 km of barrier. This product can also be marketed as a high-performance acoustic fence for residential markets. Treated glulam was also considered for utility poles. It is transmission grade poles where glulam would best fit the market as the demand is for longer poles which are more difficult to get in solid wood. This type of pole is where wood is currently being displaced by tubular steel. If glulam poles were used in 25% of the replacement transmission poles per year this could equal 8 mmbf. Light poles or standards are another market to consider. While this is a relatively low volume market glulam light standards are a premium product in European markets.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.