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15 records – page 1 of 2.

Accommodating Movement in High-Rise Wood-Frame Building Construction

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1875
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Other Materials
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Author
Howe, Richard
Publisher
Forest Products Society
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Journal Article
Material
Steel-Timber Composite
Other Materials
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Floors
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Connections
Keywords
Detailing
Shrinkage
Differential Movement
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood Design Focus
Summary
Ease of construction and favorable overall costs relative to other construction types are making high-rise (i.e., 4- and 5-story) wood frame construction increasingly popular. With these buildings increasing in height, there is a greater impetus on designers to address frame and finishes movement in such construction. As we all know, buildings are dynamic creatures experiencing a variety of movements during construction and over their service life. In wood frame construction, it is important to consider not only absolute movement but also differential movement between dissimilar materials. This article focuses on differential movement issues and how to recognize their potential and avoid problems by effective detailing.
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Displacement-Based Seismic Design of Timber Structures

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1891
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Floors
Beams
Columns
Frames
Author
Loss, Cristiano
Publisher
University of Trento
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Thesis
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Other Materials
Application
Wood Building Systems
Walls
Floors
Beams
Columns
Frames
Topic
Design and Systems
Seismic
Keywords
Direct Displacement-Based Design
Direct-DBD
Full-Scale
Single Family Houses
Multi-Storey
Connections
Research Status
Complete
Notes
Doctoral Thesis (PhD)
Summary
The research is aimed at developing seismic methods for the design and evaluation of the seismic vulnerability of wooden structures, using a displacement-based approach. After a brief introduction on the seismic behaviour of timber structures, the general Direct Displacement-Based Design (Direct-DBD) procedure and the state-of-the-art are presented, with clear reference to the application of the Direct-DBD method to wooden buildings. The strength of the Direct-DBD method is its ability to design structures in a manner consistent with the level of damage expected, by directly relating the response and the expected performance of the structure. The research begins with a description of the procedural aspects of the Direct-DBD method and the parameters required for its application. The research presented focuses on the formulation of a displacement-based seismic design procedure, applicable to one-storey wooden structures made with a portal system. This typology is very common in Europe and particularly in Italy. A series of analytical expressions have been developed to calculate design parameters. The required analytical Direct-DBD parameters are implemented based on the mechanical behaviour of the connections, made with metal dowel-type fasteners. The calibration and subsequent validation of design parameters use a Monte Carlo numerical simulation and outcomes obtained by tests in full-scale. After the description of the Displacement-Based method for one-storey wooden structures, a series of guidelines to extend the Direct-DBD methodology to other types and categories of timber systems are proposed. The thesis presents the case of a multi-storey wood frame construction, which is a simple extension of the glulam portal frame system. Part of this work has been done within the RELUIS Project, (REte dei Laboratori Universitari di Ingegneria Sismica), Research Line IV, which in the years between 2005 and 2008 involved several Italian universities and Italian institutes of research in the development of new seismic design methods. The Project produced the first draft of model code for the seismic design of structures based on displacement (Direct-DBD). This thesis is the background to the section of the model code developed for timber structures.
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Determining Optimised H3 LOSP Treatment Options for Decay Protection in Softwood Glulam

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1930
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Author
Cookson, Laurie
Publisher
Forest & Wood Products Australia
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Report
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Application
Beams
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
LOSP
CCA
TBTN
Treated Wood
Research Status
Complete
Summary
The objective of this research was to examine the LOSP treatment options available for H3 exposed glulam of Pinus radiata and P. elliottii. Test specimens were treated before or after gluing with azole LOSP, while some were treated with TBTN or CCA for comparison. They were then exposed at Innisfail or in an Accelerated Field Simulator (AFS) designed to give severe exposure and accelerated results. After 3.1–3.2 years, test specimens were given a performance rating from a scale of 8 (sound) to 0 (destroyed by decay). The results suggest that treating glulam before gluing will generally give better performance than treatment after gluing. Decay was more rapid in vertically exposed than horizontally exposed specimens, suggesting that glulam posts need special attention to prevent water penetration. End grain sealants based on copper naphthenate or zinc naphthenate gave improved decay resistance, but on their own were insufficient for post end protection. This suggests that a better approach would be to include barriers (caps) as well, or to use designs where the end is not exposed to rain or can drain away readily.
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Timber in Multi-Residential, Commercial and Industrial Building: Recognising Opportunities and Constraints

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1932
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Market and Adoption
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Nolan, Gregory
Publisher
Forest & Wood Products Australia
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Report
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Multi-Residential
Commercial
Industrial
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report explores the potential increased use of timber and wood products in building construction, particularly in the growing multi-residential (i.e. units, hotels, etc.), commercial (i.e. shops, offices, etc.), and public building sectors (i.e. hospitals, schools, theatres, etc.). Many technical solutions already exist to economically and successfully include more timber in multi-storey buildings; however, the timber and wood products industry do not have sufficient staff with the skill and expertise necessary to engage the building industry regularly and effectively. The building products industry is highly competitive and unsupported systems can quickly be overshadowed. This report recommends the timber and wood products industry develop its own capacity in timber design and construction, and support increased capacity in these areas in the building design professions and the general building industry. Timber industry staff may need further training and education to create and sell timber-based technical solutions for projects, rather than just products.
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Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Design and Systems
Application
Bridges and Spans

Block Shear Testing of CLT Panels: An Exploratory Study

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2624
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Casilla, Romulo
Pirvu, Ciprian
Wang, Brad
Lum, Conroy
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Adhesive
Block Shear Test
Failure
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A study was conducted with the primary objective of examining the efficacy of a standard block shear test method to assess the bond quality of cross-laminated timber (CLT) products. The secondary objective was to examine the effect of pressure and adhesive type on the block shear properties of CLT panels. The wood material used for the CLT samples was Select grade nominal 25 x 152-mm (1 x 6-inch) Hem-Fir. Three adhesive types were evaluated under two test conditions: dry and vacuum-pressure-dry (VPD), the latter as described in CSA standard O112.10. Shear strength and wood failure were evaluated for each test condition. Among the four properties evaluated (dry and VPD shear strength, and dry and VPD wood failure), only the VPD wood failure showed consistency in assessing the bond quality of the CLT panels in terms of the factors (pressure and adhesive type) evaluated. Adhesive type had a strong effect on VPD wood failure. The different performance levels of the three adhesives were useful in providing insights into how the VPD block shear wood failure test responds to significant changes in CLT manufacturing parameters. The pressure used in fabricating the CLT panels showed a strong effect on VPD wood failure as demonstrated for one of the adhesives. VPD wood failure decreased with decreasing pressure. Although dry shear wood failure was able to detect the effect of pressure, it failed to detect the effect of adhesive type on the bond quality of the CLT panels. These results provide support as to the effectiveness of the VPD block shear wood failure test in assessing the bond quality of CLT panels. The VPD conditioning treatment was able to identify poor bondline manufacturing conditions by observed changes in the mode of failure, which is also considered an indication of wood-adhesive bond durability. These results corroborate those obtained from the delamination test conducted in a previous study (Casilla et al. 2011). Along with the delamination test proposed in an earlier report, the VPD block shear wood failure can be used to assess the CLT bond quality. Although promising, more testing is needed to assess whether the VPD block shear wood failure can be used in lieu of the delamination test. The other properties studied (shear strength and dry wood failure), however, were not found to be useful in consistently assessing bond line manufacturing quality.
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Checking in CLT Panels: An Exploratory Study

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2625
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Moisture
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Casilla, Romulo
Lum, Conroy
Pirvu, Ciprian
Wang, Brad
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Moisture
Keywords
Panels
Testing Methods
Surface Checks
Moisture Content
Gaps
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A study was conducted with the primary objective of gathering information for the development of a protocol for evaluating the surface quality of cross-laminated timber (CLT) products. The secondary objectives were to examine the effect of moisture content (MC) reduction on the development of surface checks and gaps, and find ways of minimizing the checking problems in CLT panels. The wood materials used for the CLT samples were rough-sawn Select grade Hem-Fir boards 25 x 152 mm (1 x 6 inches). Polyurethane was the adhesive used. The development of checks and gaps were evaluated after drying at two temperature levels at ambient relative humidity (RH). The checks and gaps, as a result of drying to 6% to 10% MC from an initial MC of 13%, occurred randomly depending upon the characteristics of the wood and the manner in which the outer laminas were laid up in the panel. Suggestions are made for minimizing checking and gap problems in CLT panels. The checks and gaps close when the panels are exposed to higher humidity. Guidelines were proposed for the development of a protocol for classifying CLT panels into appearance grades in terms of the severity of checks and gaps. The grades can be based on the estimated dimensions of the checks and gaps, their frequency, and the number of laminas in which they appear.
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Delamination Testing of CLT Panels: An Exploratory Study

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2626
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Casilla, Romulo
Pirvu, Ciprian
Wang, Brad
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Report
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Adhesive
Bond Quality
Delamination Test
Strength
Research Status
Complete
Summary
A study was conducted with the primary objective of examining the efficacy of delamination test using cylindrical core specimens to assess the bond quality of cross laminated timber (CLT) products. A prototype coring drill bit was fabricated to prepare a cylindrical-shaped specimen, the height of which corresponds to the full thickness of the CLT panel. A secondary objective was to examine the effect of pressure, adhesive type, number of plies, and specimen shape on the delamination resistance of CLT panels. The wood material used for the CLT samples was Select grade nominal 1 x 6-inch Hem-Fir boards. Examples of three adhesive types were evaluated, which were designated as A, B, and C. The delamination tests used were as described in CAN / CSA O122-06 and EN 302-2. Cylindrical specimen extracted as core was found satisfactory as a test specimen type for use in delamination testing of CLT product. Its efficacy was comparable to that of a square cross-section specimen. The former is recommended as it can be extracted from thicker panels and from any location in the panel. It would also be more convenient to plug the round hole. Adhesive type had a strong effect on delamination resistance based on the two delamination tests used. Adhesive A exhibited the greatest delamination resistance, followed in decreasing order, by adhesives C and B. It should be noted that no effort was made to find the optimum CLT manufacturing parameters for each type of adhesive. Therefore the relative rankings of the adhesives tested may not be representative. However, for the purposes of this study, the different performance levels from the three adhesives are useful in providing insight into how the proposed delamination test responds to significant changes in CLT manufacturing parameters. Pressure used in fabricating the CLT panel showed a strong effect on delamination resistance as demonstrated for one of the adhesives. Delamination resistance decreased with decreasing pressure. The effect of the number of plies in the CLT panel was dependent upon the type of adhesive, and this was probably related to the adhesive’s assembly time characteristic. These results provide support as to the effectiveness of delamination test in assessing the moisture durability of CLT panels. It was able to differentiate the performance in delamination resistance among different types of adhesives, and able to detect the effect of manufacturing parameters such as pressure and increased number of plies in CLT construction. The test procedure described in CAN / CSA O122-06 appears to be reasonable in the delamination resistance assessment of CLT panels for qualification and quality control testing. Based on the results of the study along with some background information and guidelines, delamination requirements for CLT panels are proposed. The permitted delamination values are greater than those currently specified for laminated and fingerjoined lumber products. This is in recognition of the higher bond line stresses when bonded perpendicular laminations (i.e. CLT) are exposed to the delamination wetting and drying cycles, as opposed to parallel laminations (i.e. glulam or fingerjoints).
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Cost, Time and Environmental Impacts of the Construction of the New NMIT Arts and Media Building

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue251
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
John, Stephen
Mulligan, Kerry
Perez, Nicolas
Love, Simon
Page, Ian
Organization
University of Canterbury
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Report
Material
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Cost
Design and Systems
Energy Performance
Keywords
Life Cycle Cost Study
Research Status
Complete
Summary
This report was produced by the University of Canterbury for the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry under Expression of Interest MAF POL 0910-11665. The report covers extensive research carried out on the construction of the new Arts and Media building at Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology in Nelson, New Zealand, between March 2010 and June 2011. The collaborative research programme was directed by the Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering at the University of Canterbury (UC), Christchurch. Major contributions to the research programme were made by third-party industry consultants and reported in separate documents – a copy of all the original reports is included in the Appendices ; ScionResearch - Carbon and Energy Footprint of a new three storey building at Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology (NMIT), Simon Love (2011); BRANZ (Building Research Association of New Zealand) - Nelson-Marlborough Institute of Technology Arts Building – An assessement of life cycle costs for alternative designs (BRANZ report E568), Ian Page (2010); Aurecon Group and ISJ Architects (working together) – NMIT Alternative Structural Design; Ref. 210688-001 (August, 2010).
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Bond Behavior between Glulam and GFRP’s by Pullout Tests

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue560
Year of Publication
2011
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Sena-Cruz, José
Branco, Jorge
Jorge, Marco
Barros, Joaquim
Silva, Catarina
Cunha, Vitor
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2011
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Connections
Design and Systems
Keywords
GFRP
Bond behavior
Pull-Out Tests
Stress-Slip
Research Status
Complete
Series
Composites Part B: Engineering
Summary
To evaluate the bond behavior between glulam and GFRP rods, applied according to the nearsurface mounted strengthening technique, an experimental program composed of beam and direct pullout tests was carried. In this experimental program three main variables were analyzed: the GFRP type, the GFRP location into the groove, and the bond length. From the monitoring system it was registered the loaded and free end slips, and the pullout force. Based on these experimental results, and applying an analytical-numerical strategy, the local bond stress-slip relationship was calculated. In this work the tests are described, the obtained results are presented and discussed, and the applicability of the inverse analysis to obtain the local bond law is demonstrated.
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15 records – page 1 of 2.