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26 records – page 1 of 3.

8 – Cross Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1166
Year of Publication
2015
Topic
General Information
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Harris, Richard
Publisher
ScienceDirect
Year of Publication
2015
Country of Publication
Netherlands
Format
Book Section
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
General Information
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Manufacturing
Research
Joints
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Wood Composites
Online Access
Payment Required
Resource Link
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Advanced Wood-Based Solutions for Mid-Rise and High-Rise Construction: Acoustic Performance of Innovative Composite Wood Stud Partition Walls

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1181
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Acoustics and Vibration
Application
Walls
Author
Hu, Lin
Cuerrier-Auclair, Samuel
Deng, James
Wang, Xiang-Ming
Organization
FPInnovations
Year of Publication
2018
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Report
Application
Walls
Topic
Design and Systems
Mechanical Properties
Acoustics and Vibration
Keywords
Sound Insulation
Manufacturing
Partition Walls
Steel
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Summary
Airborne sound insulation performance of wall assemblies is a critical aspect which is directly associated with the comfort level of the occupants, which in turn affects the market acceptance. In single-family and low-rise residential buildings, the partition walls, whether loadbearing or non-loadbearing, are commonly framed with studs of solid sawn lumber of 2x4, 2x6, and 2x8. In commercial buildings and multi-storey residential buildings, the partition walls are commonly framed using light-gauge steel studs. The shortcomings of solid sawn lumber studs form the motivation for this project to develop wood studs that would address these shortcomings to promote greater wood use in partition walls. The conceptual design and fabrication work and the preliminary test results have shown that are partition-wall stud made out of composite wood material could have the same or better airborne sound insulation performance as compared to the 25 gauge steel stud. The concept is promising, with a manufacturing process and fabrication that would work and be practical.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Against the Grain: Redefining the Living Unit – Advanced Slotting Strategies for Multi-Storey Timber Buildings

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue795
Year of Publication
2014
Topic
Design and Systems
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Author
Kaiser, Alex
Larsson, Magnus
Girhammar, Ulf
Year of Publication
2014
Country of Publication
Canada
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Application
Wood Building Systems
Topic
Design and Systems
Keywords
Manufacturing
Multi-Storey
CNC
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 10-14, 2014, Quebec City, Canada
Summary
Using Charles and Ray Eames’s famous 1950s House of Cards slotting toy as both design metaphor and structural precedent provides the starting point for a novel building logic (utilising three existing Swedish timber systems) that allows volumetrically slotted units to stack inside of and support each other. Contemporary computer-aided fabrication techniques based on evolutionary algorithms and CNC manufacturing strategies are used to produce a methodology for designing a kit-of-parts system at the scale of the skyscraper, based on the slotting together of cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels. A catalogue of novel slotting methods is produced, and a number of alternative slotted joint treatments identified that hold promising potential for further development, parametrically design and control volumes, understand the fabrication workflow and constructional sequence on site, and build prototypes of the chosen slotting configurations at scales ranging between 1:50 and 1:1.
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Bending and Rolling Shear Capacities of Southern Pine Cross Laminated Timber (CLT)

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1596
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Gu, Mengzhe
Pang, Weichiang
Stoner, Michael
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Southern Pine
US
Manufacturing
Rolling Shear
Bending
Three Point Bending Test
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1899-1906
Summary
Southern Pine (SP) is one of the fastest growing softwood species in the Southern Forest of United States. With its high strength to weight ratio, SP becomes an ideal candidate for manufacturing engineered wood products such as cross laminated timber (CLT). Two batches of CLT panels were manufactured using visually graded SP lumbers in...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Bonded Timber-Concrete Composite Floors with Lightweight Concrete

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1699
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Connections
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Author
Schmid, Volker
Zauft, Doreen
Polak, Maria
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
Timber-Concrete Composite
Application
Floors
Topic
Connections
Keywords
Lightweight Concrete
Epoxy
Adhesives
Manufacturing
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4360-4367
Summary
This paper examines a new and very promising concept for prefabricated timber-concrete-composite floors (TCC-floors), were the heavy normal weight concrete is replaced by a lightweight concrete (LC) with a density of about 17 kN/m³. Investigations into the connections between lightweight concrete and timber indicate that the...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Comparison of Sustainability Performance for Cross Laminated Timber and Concrete

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue509
Year of Publication
2013
Topic
Environmental Impact
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Piacenza, Joseph
Tumer, Irem
Seyedmahmoudi, Seyedhamed
Haapala, Karl
Hoyle, Christopher
Publisher
ASME
Year of Publication
2013
Country of Publication
United States
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Environmental Impact
Keywords
Life-Cycle Assessment
Social Impact
Sustainability
Reinforced Concrete
Economic Aspect
Manufacturing
Language
English
Conference
International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 4–7, 2013, Portland, Oregon, USA
Online Access
Payment Required
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Comparisons of the Production Standards for Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) in Europe versus USA

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1705
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Market and Adoption
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Author
Young, Timothy
Barbu, Marius
Hindman, Daniel
Weissensteiner, Josef
Tudor, Eugenia
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Market and Adoption
Keywords
Europe
North America
Manufacturing
Standards
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 4412-4419
Summary
Cross laminated timber (CLT) is a new engineered wood product that has experienced rapid growth and market acceptance for residential and non-residential construction in western and central Europe. Potential exists for rapid market adoption in North America if manufacturing capacities are developed...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Composite Cross Laminated Timber (CCLT) Made with Engineered Wood Products (EWP) and Hardwood

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue1578
Year of Publication
2016
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Author
Grandmont, Jean-Frédéric
Wang, Brad
Year of Publication
2016
Country of Publication
Austria
Format
Conference Paper
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)
LSL (Laminated Strand Lumber)
LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber)
Topic
Design and Systems
Cost
Mechanical Properties
Keywords
Dimensional Stability
SPF
Birch
Aspen
Maple
Equilibrium Moisture Content
Delamination
Bond Line
Manufacturing
Language
English
Conference
World Conference on Timber Engineering
Research Status
Complete
Notes
August 22-25, 2016, Vienna, Austria p. 1723-1730
Summary
North American cross laminated timber is currently made of softwood lumber following the guidelines of the ANSI/APA PRG-320 manufacturing standard. In this study, the potential of manufacturing CLT panels using various hardwood species and engineered wood products (EWP) was investigated for their compatibility and the impact...
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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Cross-Laminated Secondary Timber: Experimental Testing and Modelling the Effect of Defects and Reduced Feedstock Properties

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue2104
Year of Publication
2018
Topic
Environmental Impact
Mechanical Properties
Material
CLT (Cross-Laminated Timber)

Damage Problems in Glued Laminated Timber

https://research.thinkwood.com/en/permalink/catalogue165
Year of Publication
2012
Topic
Serviceability
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Author
Vanya, Csilla
Year of Publication
2012
Country of Publication
Poland
Format
Journal Article
Material
Glulam (Glue-Laminated Timber)
Topic
Serviceability
Keywords
Construction
Damage
Delamination
Loads
Manufacturing
Service Life
Stress
Tension
Language
English
Research Status
Complete
Series
Drewno
Online Access
Free
Resource Link
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26 records – page 1 of 3.